Home » [Update] English ESL worksheets, activities for distance learning and physical classrooms (x95614) | present perfect simple tense – NATAVIGUIDES

[Update] English ESL worksheets, activities for distance learning and physical classrooms (x95614) | present perfect simple tense – NATAVIGUIDES

present perfect simple tense: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

[Update] Present Perfect Tense | present perfect simple tense – NATAVIGUIDES

What Is the Present Perfect Tense? (with Examples)

The present perfect tense describes an action that began in the past (despite being a present tense). For example:

  • John

    has taken

    Sarah’s advice.

  • They

    have fixed

    the fence.

Often, the action being described is still continuing into the present (e.g., John continues to take Sarah’s advice). This is how the present perfect tense differs from the

A Video Summary

Here is a short video summarizing the present perfect tense:

Thedescribes an action that began in the past (despite being a present tense). For example:Often, the action being described is still continuing into the present (e.g., John continues to take Sarah’s advice). This is how the present perfect tense differs from the simple past tense Here is a short video summarizing the present perfect tense:

Infographic for the Present Perfect Tense

Here is an infographic explaining the present perfect tense:

More Examples of the Present Perfect Tense

Here are some more examples of the present perfect tense:

  • The board

    has decided

    to uphold the appeal.

  • (This sentence carries the connotation that the board continues to uphold the appeal.)

  • I

    have taken

    the wrong path.

  • (Connotation: I am still on the wrong path.)

Comparing the Present Perfect Tense and the Simple Past Tense

Here is another example of the present perfect tense (highlighted). For comparison, the example is given alongside similar-looking example featuring the simple past tense.

  • Janet

    has run

    two miles.

  • (This is the present perfect tense. In this example, Janet is still running when the words were said.)

  • Janet ran two miles.
  • (This is the simple past tense. In this example, Janet has stopped running when the words were said.)

Here is another example:

  • David

    has worked

    alongside two of the world’s finest scientists in the field of entomology.

  • (This is the present perfect tense. In this example, David might have finished working with those scientists, but the sentence carries the connotation that he is still working as an entomologist.)

  • David worked alongside two of the world’s finest scientists in the field of entomology.
  • (This is the simple past tense. This example carries the connotation that David no longer works as an entomologist.)

Forming the Present Perfect Tense

The present perfect tense is formed:

Here is an infographic explaining the present perfect tense:Here are some more examples of the present perfect tense:Here is another example of the present perfect tense (highlighted). For comparison, the example is given alongside similar-looking example featuring the simple past tense.Here is another example:Theis formed:

[subject]

+

“has” or “have”

+

[past participle]

  • I have worked.
  • She has painted.

Forming the Past Participle (Regular Verbs)

If it’s a past participle is the same as the

Add “ed” to most verbs:

  • jump > jumped
  • paint > painted

If a verb of one syllable ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], double the final consonant and add “ed”:

  • chat > chatted
  • stop > stopped

If the final consonant is “w,” “x,” or “y,” don’t double it:

  • sew > sewed
  • play > played
  • fix > fixed

If last syllable of a longer verb is stressed and ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], double the last consonant and add “ed”:

  • incur > incurred
  • prefer > preferred

If the first syllable of a longer verb is stressed and the verb ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], just add “ed”:

  • open > opened
  • enter > entered
  • swallow > swallowed

If the verb ends “e,” just add “d”:

  • thrive > thrived
  • guzzle > guzzled

If the verb ends [consonant + “y”], change the “y” to an “i” and add “ed”:

  • cry > cried
  • fry > fried

Forming the Past Participle (Irregular Verbs)

If it’s an past participle is formed in all sorts of different ways. Here are some examples:

  • arise > arisen
  • catch > caught
  • choose > chosen
  • know > known

You just have to learn them.

Read more about irregular verbs (includes a list of the most common irregular verbs).

The Negative Version

If you need the negative version, you can use the following construction:

If it’s a regular verb , theis the same as the simple past tense . In other words, it is formed like this:Add “ed” to most verbs:If a verb of one syllable ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], double the final consonant and add “ed”:If the final consonant is “w,” “x,” or “y,” don’t double it:If last syllable of a longer verb is stressed and ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], double the last consonant and add “ed”:If the first syllable of a longer verb is stressed and the verb ends [consonant-vowel-consonant], just add “ed”:If the verb ends “e,” just add “d”:If the verb ends [consonant + “y”], change the “y” to an “i” and add “ed”:If it’s an irregular verb , theis formed in all sorts of different ways. Here are some examples:You just have to learn them.If you need the negative version, you can use the following construction:

[subject]

+

“has not” or “have not”

+

[past participle]

  • The board

    has not decided

    to uphold the appeal.

  • I

    have not taken

    the wrong path.

Remember that “has not” is sometimes written as the

The Question Version

If you need to ask a question, you can use the following word order for a yes/no question:

Remember that “has not” is sometimes written as the contraction “hasn’t.”If you need to ask a question, you can use the following word order for a yes/no question:

“has” or “have”

+

[subject]

+

[past participle]

  • Has the board decided

    to uphold the appeal?

  • Have I taken

    the wrong path?

You can use the following word order for a

You can use the following word order for a question-word question

[question word]

+

“has” or “have”

+

[subject]

+

[past participle]

  • Why has the board decided

    to uphold the appeal?

  • How have I taken

    the wrong path?

Verb Tense Widget

Use this widget to learn about the different tenses. How do you use this widget? Well, if there’s a button, a drop-down menu, or a , then you can click it!

to

base form

(

verb)

verb)

Select the tenses.

Present Tenses

Simple Present Tense
The simple present tense is mostly used to describe facts and habits. More…(opens new tab)
I base form
you base form
he/she/it 3rd pers sing present
we base form
you base form
they base form

Present Progressive Tense
The present progressive tense is used for an ongoing action in the present.
More…(opens new tab)
I am present participle
you are present participle
he/she/it is present participle
we are present participle
you are present participle
they are present participle

Present Perfect Tense
The present perfect tense is used for actions that began in the past. (Often, the actions continue into the present.)
More…(opens new tab)
I have past participle
you have past participle
he/she/it has past participle
we have past participle
you have past participle
they have past participle

Present Perfect Progressive Tense
The present perfect progressive tense is used for a continuous activity that began in the past and continues into the present, or a continuous activity that began in past but has now finished (usually very recently).
More…(opens new tab)
I have been present participle
you have been present participle
he/she/it has been present participle
we have been present participle
you have been present participle
they have been present participle

Past Tenses

Simple Past
The simple past tense is used to describe a completed activity that happened in the past.
More…(opens new tab)
I past tense
you past tense
he/she/it past tense
we past tense
you past tense
they past tense

Past Progressive Tense
The past progressive tense is used to describe an ongoing activity in the past. Often, it is used to set the scene for another action.
More…(opens new tab)
I was present participle
you were present participle
he/she/it was present participle
we were present participle
you were present participle
they were present participle

Past Perfect Tense
The past perfect tense is used to emphasize that an action was completed before another took place.
More…(opens new tab)
I had past participle
you had past participle
he/she/it had past participle
we had past participle
you had past participle
they had past participle

Past Perfect Progressive Tense
The past perfect progressive tense is used to show that an ongoing action in the past has ended.
More…(opens new tab)
I had been present participle
you had been present participle
he/she/it had been present participle
we had been present participle
you had been present participle
they had been present participle

Future Tenses

Simple Future
The simple future tense is used for an action that will occur in the future.
More…(opens new tab)
I will base form
you will base form
he/she/it will base form
we will base form
you will base form
they will base form

Future Progressive Tense
The future progressive tense is used for an ongoing action that will occur in the future.
More…(opens new tab)
I will be present participle
you will be present participle
he/she/it will be present participle
we will be present participle
you will be present participle
they will be present participle

Future Perfect Tense
The future perfect tense is used to describe an action that will have been completed at some point in the future.
More…(opens new tab)
I will have past participle
you will have past participle
he/she/it will have past participle
we will have past participle
you will have past participle
they will have past participle

Future Perfect Progressive Tense
The future perfect progressive tense is used for an ongoing action that will be completed at some specified time in the future.
More…(opens new tab)
I will have been present participle
you will have been present participle
he/she/it will have been present participle
we will have been present participle
you will have been present participle
they will have been present participle

The Other Present Tenses

The present perfect tense is one of four present

Slider Showing All the Tenses

The following slider shows all 12

Use this widget to learn about the different tenses. How do you use this widget? Well, if there’s a button, a drop-down menu, or a, then you can click it!Theis one of four present tenses . This table shows all four of the present tenses:The following slider shows all 12 tenses . The present perfect tense is highlighted with a yellow background.


Present Perfect | Fun English Grammar Lessons | Learn English


Learn all about the Present Perfect Tense with examples. Get the transcripts: https://bit.ly/3awajHB
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Present Perfect | Fun English Grammar Lessons | Learn English

English Verb Tenses Conversations


This video will make it easier for you to learn and understand the correct use of English Verb Tenses through real life conversations.
Contents: Present Simple Tense, Present Continuous, Present Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, Past Simple Tense, Past Continuous, Past Perfect, Past Perfect Continuous, Future Will \u0026 Be Going To, Future Continuous \u0026 Future Perfect

English Verb Tenses Conversations

The Present Perfect Tense | English Grammar Lesson


This lesson is an overview of the present perfect tense
What it looks like, how to use it and when to use it!
Structure:
Subject + have/has + main verb (past participle form)
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
If you don’t feel confident using the present perfect tense in English yet… There are probably a few reasons why!
You need to know the past participle form of English verbs… And that can be pretty tricky with irregular verbs! 😳
And you need to understand how to use this tense! Perhaps you feel unsure about when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tenses.
I will explain all of this inside this lesson.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
When using the present perfect tense, you need an auxiliary verb that helps your main verb to function.
In the perfect tenses, the verb (to) have is always the auxiliary verb.
In the present perfect tense, the main verb is in the past participle form.
This is not difficult for regular past tense verbs. For regular verbs, the past participle form of the verb is the same as the past tense verb, so you just add ed!
But irregular verbs are different and the only way to learn the past participle form is to learn them individually.
Past simple or present perfect tense?
To answer this question you need to think about time. Finished time and unfinished time.
Think about ‘last week’. That’s a good example of finished time. Last week is finished, it’s over.
Yesterday, last week, last month, last year, 1991 these are all examples of finished time… Time that is complete.
What about ‘this week’? Is this week finished? No! Not yet. That is an example of unfinished time. There’s still more of this week to come. It’s not finished yet.
When you are talking about a time period that has finished, use the past simple.
When you are talking about a time period that is unfinished… Like today, this week, this month, this year, use the present perfect.
Watch this lesson to learn when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple tense.
Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/09/13/thepresentperfecttense/

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The Present Perfect Tense | English Grammar Lesson

Present Perfect Tense✍


İngilizce derslerine devam ediyoruz! Videomuzda ”Present Perfect Tense’ konumuzu detaylı öğreniyoruz. 🤓 ingilizce presentperfect presentperfecttense
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Present Perfect Tense✍

What Did You Do? Simple Past Tense


Learn how to talk about your day or about your weekend and how to ask questions using Past Tense Verbs.

What Did You Do? Simple Past Tense

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