Home » [NEW] Uncountable Nouns | uncountable noun – NATAVIGUIDES

[NEW] Uncountable Nouns | uncountable noun – NATAVIGUIDES

uncountable noun: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

What is an uncountable noun?

uncountable nouns (also known as mass nouns or non-count nouns). These can be tangible objects (such as substances or collective categories of things), or intangible or abstract things, such as concepts or ideas. Nouns that be divided are called count nouns.

Nouns that cannot be divided or counted as individual elements or separate parts are called(also known asor). These can be tangible objects (such as substances or collective categories of things), or intangible or abstract things, such as concepts or ideas. Nouns thatbe divided are called countable nouns , or simply

Here are some examples of uncountable nouns:

Substances

Collective categories

Abstract ideas or concepts

wood

smoke

air

water

furniture

homework

accommodation

luggage

love

hate

beauty

intelligence

arrogance

access

news*

(*Even though ends in an “-s,” it is uncountable. We need this “-s” because without it, would become , which is an adjective.)

Using articles with uncountable nouns

Uncountable nouns cannot take the indefinite articles “a” or “an” in a sentence, because these words indicate a single amount of something. For example:

(We often use the words “some” or “any” to indicate an unspecified quantity of uncountable nouns. We’ll investigate this more in a later part of this section.)

Although uncountable nouns cannot take or , they

are

sometimes able to take the definite article , as in:

  • “Have you heard news?”
  • furniture in my living room is old.”

However, this is only the case if a specific uncountable noun is being described. For example:

Uncountable nouns are not plural

Third-person singular vs. third-person plural pronouns

Just as uncountable nouns cannot take the indefinite articles “a” or “an” because there is not “one” of them, it is equally incorrect to use third-person plural pronouns with them, as they are not considered a collection of single things. For example:

  • Person A: “Your hair looks very nice today.”

Note that single hairs become countable. If there are two hairs on your jacket, you can say “hairs” or use the plural pronoun “they.” The hair on your head, however, is seen as an uncountable noun. We will discuss nouns that can be either countable or uncountable depending on context in greater detail further on.

Plural forms of the noun

We also cannot make uncountable nouns plural by adding “-s” on the end. Again, they are grammatically regarded as single, collective units. For example:

Subject-verb agreement

Because uncountable nouns cannot be plural, it is very important to use the correct subject-verb agreement. Subject-verb agreement refers to using certain conjugations of verbs with singular vs. plural subjects. This happens most noticeably with the verb , which becomes or with singular subject nouns and or with plural subjects. Because uncountable nouns are grammatically singular, they must take singular forms of their verbs.

Here are a few examples illustrating this distinction:

Measurements of distance, time, and amount

A notable exception to the subject-verb rule we just discussed relates to countable nouns that are describing measurements of distance, time, or amount. In this case, we consider the sum as a singular amount, and so they must take singular forms of their verbs. For example:

Making uncountable nouns countable

If we want to identify one or more specific “units” of an uncountable noun, then we must add more information to the sentence to make this clear.

For example, if you want to give someone advice in general, you could say:

  • “Can I give you advice?” or;
  • “Can I give you some advice?”

But if you wanted to emphasize that you’d like to give them a particular aspect or facet of advice, you could not say, “Can I give you an advice?” Instead, we have to add more information to specify what we want to give:

  • “Can I give you a piece of advice?”

By adding “piece of” to the uncountable noun , we have now made it

functionally

countable. This means that we can also make this phrase plural, though we have to be careful to pluralize the count noun that we’ve added, and not the uncountable noun itself. For example:

  • “Can I give you of advice?”

Omitting the units from uncountable food and drink nouns

To make certain uncountable nouns plural, we add units of measurement to them, as in “pieces of ,” which we looked at above. We also do this with uncountable nouns for food and drink:

  • “I’d like of water and of coffee, please.”
  • “Chef, I need of chili and of beef, in a hurry!”

However, English speakers are fond of omitting parts of a phrase to speak more quickly or fluidly (a process called ), and this is often done with the units of uncountable nouns. Because of this, it would not be uncommon to hear people say the previous two sentences without the units of measurement, simply making the uncountable nouns plural instead:

  • “I’d like and , please.”
  • “Chef, I need and , in a hurry!”

Note that this is quite informal, and it is not always acceptable to elide uncountable noun phrases. (It would sound awkward to say “four rices” instead of “four bowls of rice,” for example.) The only way to know when and if an uncountable noun for food or drink can be pluralized like this is to listen to the way native English speakers talk. If you are in doubt, simply include the units of measurement, as that will always be correct.

Using quantifiers with uncountable nouns

quantifiers (a kind of determiner that specifies an amount of something) can only be used with uncountable nouns, while others can only modify countable nouns. While we will examine these more in depth in the chapter on

As we’ve already seen, certain(a kind ofthat specifies an amount of something) can only be used with uncountable nouns, while others can only modify countable nouns. While we will examine these more in depth in the chapter on Determiners , here are a few examples that cause particular confusion.

Too – Too Much – Too Many

We use + an adjective to mean “beyond what is needed or desirable,” as in, “It is too big.”

, on the other hand, is used to modify uncountable nouns, while is used with countable nouns—they are not used with adjectives. For example, the following sentences would both be incorrect:

One particular source of confusion that can arise here is the fact that can be used as an adverb

before

to give it emphasis, as in:

We also must be sure not to use with a countable noun, nor with an uncountable noun.

Fewer vs. Less

The conventional rule regarding is that we use with countable nouns and with uncountable nouns. For example:

The rule carries over when we add words to an uncountable noun to make a countable phrase (as we looked at above). We can see this distinction in the following examples:

Measurements of distance, time, and amount

As we noted above, measurements of distance, time, or amount for nouns that we would normally consider countable (and thus plural) end up taking singular verbs. Likewise, these terms also take the word , most often in the construction . For example:

  • $20,000 is we expected to pay.”
  • “We walked 50 miles to get here.”
  • “We have two hours to finish this project.”
  • “I weigh 20 pounds I used to.”

Note, however, that we generally can’t use

before

these kinds of nouns:

is also used with countable nouns in the construction , as in:

  • “That is problem to worry about.”

can also be used (albeit less commonly), but the construction usually changes to , as in:

  • “That is one problem to worry about.”

Rule or non-rule?

It is important to note that many grammar guides dispute the necessity of this supposed “rule,” referencing that it was in fact implemented as a stylistic preference by the 1770 grammarian Robert Baker, and that and had been used interchangeably for countable and uncountable nouns for hundreds of years before that. Specifically, it is considered by some as acceptable to use with countable nouns, especially in informal or colloquial writing and speech.

As long as the sentence does not sound awkward, it is probably safe to do so. However, many still regard the rule as indisputable, so it is recommended to adhere to the rule for professional, formal, or academic writing.

Nouns that are both countable and uncountable

The general idea of countable versus uncountable nouns is simple. If something can be counted with numbers, then it is countable, as the name suggests; if not, then it is uncountable.

However, words in English often carry a number of different meanings, and these can affect whether a word will be considered countable in one instance compared to another.

Take, for instance, the following example featuring the abstract noun :

  • “He’s just looking for love.”

This is a clear instance of an uncountable noun. The abstract idea of love cannot be counted with numbers and is thus uncountable. However, the word can also mean “a person or thing one loves.” When carrying this particular meaning, is countable. For example:

  • “I have loves in my life: my wife and my work.”

Likewise, many things we would normally consider to be countable have meanings that render them countable. For instance:

  • “How many stones did they use to build this wall?” (countable—This refers to individual stones.)
  • “This tablet is made of stone.” (uncountable— in this sense refers to the

    material

    that composes the ; substances and materials are countable.)

Because the concrete noun has a subtly different meaning in these two different sentences, it is considered countable in one and uncountable in the other. Let’s look at some common examples to help reinforce the concept:

  • “She doesn’t like hearing any criticism.” (uncountable—the act of making a critical comment or judgment)
  • “I have criticismsto share.” (countable—individual critical comments or judgments)
  • “How many chickens does your uncle own?” (countable—individual live chickens)
  • “I think I’ll have chicken for dinner.” (uncountable—the meat of the chicken as a substance or material)
  • “We must all strive to avoid sin.” (uncountable—the idea or concept of sin itself)
  • “The politician has too many sins to count on one hand.” (countable—individual acts or instances of sin)

These are just a few examples of nouns that can be both countable and uncountable, depending on context and specific meaning. There are far, far too many to list every single one here, so you simply have to know which meaning a word carries in a given context and decide whether that meaning makes the noun countable or uncountable.

Quiz

1. Which article can be used with uncountable nouns?

a) a
b) an
c) the
d) A & B

2. What verb form is generally used with uncountable nouns?

a) singular
b) plural
c) singular in the past tense only
d) plural in the past tense only

3. Which of the following is an uncountable noun?

a) person
b) friend
c) intelligent
d) news

4. Which of the following is not an uncountable noun?

a) love
b) piece
c) wood
d) water

5. Which of the following sentences is correct?

a) “We are waiting for a news.”
b) “You can never have too many love.”
c) “These homeworks are very hard.”
d) “Could I have less water, please?”

[NEW] Uncountable Nouns | uncountable noun – NATAVIGUIDES

What is an uncountable noun?

uncountable nouns (also known as mass nouns or non-count nouns). These can be tangible objects (such as substances or collective categories of things), or intangible or abstract things, such as concepts or ideas. Nouns that be divided are called count nouns.

Nouns that cannot be divided or counted as individual elements or separate parts are called(also known asor). These can be tangible objects (such as substances or collective categories of things), or intangible or abstract things, such as concepts or ideas. Nouns thatbe divided are called countable nouns , or simply

Here are some examples of uncountable nouns:

Substances

Collective categories

Abstract ideas or concepts

wood

smoke

air

water

furniture

homework

accommodation

luggage

love

hate

beauty

intelligence

arrogance

access

news*

(*Even though ends in an “-s,” it is uncountable. We need this “-s” because without it, would become , which is an adjective.)

Using articles with uncountable nouns

Uncountable nouns cannot take the indefinite articles “a” or “an” in a sentence, because these words indicate a single amount of something. For example:

(We often use the words “some” or “any” to indicate an unspecified quantity of uncountable nouns. We’ll investigate this more in a later part of this section.)

Although uncountable nouns cannot take or , they

are

sometimes able to take the definite article , as in:

  • “Have you heard news?”
  • furniture in my living room is old.”

However, this is only the case if a specific uncountable noun is being described. For example:

Uncountable nouns are not plural

Third-person singular vs. third-person plural pronouns

Just as uncountable nouns cannot take the indefinite articles “a” or “an” because there is not “one” of them, it is equally incorrect to use third-person plural pronouns with them, as they are not considered a collection of single things. For example:

  • Person A: “Your hair looks very nice today.”

Note that single hairs become countable. If there are two hairs on your jacket, you can say “hairs” or use the plural pronoun “they.” The hair on your head, however, is seen as an uncountable noun. We will discuss nouns that can be either countable or uncountable depending on context in greater detail further on.

Plural forms of the noun

We also cannot make uncountable nouns plural by adding “-s” on the end. Again, they are grammatically regarded as single, collective units. For example:

Subject-verb agreement

Because uncountable nouns cannot be plural, it is very important to use the correct subject-verb agreement. Subject-verb agreement refers to using certain conjugations of verbs with singular vs. plural subjects. This happens most noticeably with the verb , which becomes or with singular subject nouns and or with plural subjects. Because uncountable nouns are grammatically singular, they must take singular forms of their verbs.

Here are a few examples illustrating this distinction:

Measurements of distance, time, and amount

A notable exception to the subject-verb rule we just discussed relates to countable nouns that are describing measurements of distance, time, or amount. In this case, we consider the sum as a singular amount, and so they must take singular forms of their verbs. For example:

Making uncountable nouns countable

If we want to identify one or more specific “units” of an uncountable noun, then we must add more information to the sentence to make this clear.

For example, if you want to give someone advice in general, you could say:

  • “Can I give you advice?” or;
  • “Can I give you some advice?”

But if you wanted to emphasize that you’d like to give them a particular aspect or facet of advice, you could not say, “Can I give you an advice?” Instead, we have to add more information to specify what we want to give:

  • “Can I give you a piece of advice?”

By adding “piece of” to the uncountable noun , we have now made it

functionally

countable. This means that we can also make this phrase plural, though we have to be careful to pluralize the count noun that we’ve added, and not the uncountable noun itself. For example:

  • “Can I give you of advice?”

Omitting the units from uncountable food and drink nouns

To make certain uncountable nouns plural, we add units of measurement to them, as in “pieces of ,” which we looked at above. We also do this with uncountable nouns for food and drink:

  • “I’d like of water and of coffee, please.”
  • “Chef, I need of chili and of beef, in a hurry!”

However, English speakers are fond of omitting parts of a phrase to speak more quickly or fluidly (a process called ), and this is often done with the units of uncountable nouns. Because of this, it would not be uncommon to hear people say the previous two sentences without the units of measurement, simply making the uncountable nouns plural instead:

  • “I’d like and , please.”
  • “Chef, I need and , in a hurry!”

Note that this is quite informal, and it is not always acceptable to elide uncountable noun phrases. (It would sound awkward to say “four rices” instead of “four bowls of rice,” for example.) The only way to know when and if an uncountable noun for food or drink can be pluralized like this is to listen to the way native English speakers talk. If you are in doubt, simply include the units of measurement, as that will always be correct.

Using quantifiers with uncountable nouns

quantifiers (a kind of determiner that specifies an amount of something) can only be used with uncountable nouns, while others can only modify countable nouns. While we will examine these more in depth in the chapter on

As we’ve already seen, certain(a kind ofthat specifies an amount of something) can only be used with uncountable nouns, while others can only modify countable nouns. While we will examine these more in depth in the chapter on Determiners , here are a few examples that cause particular confusion.

Too – Too Much – Too Many

We use + an adjective to mean “beyond what is needed or desirable,” as in, “It is too big.”

, on the other hand, is used to modify uncountable nouns, while is used with countable nouns—they are not used with adjectives. For example, the following sentences would both be incorrect:

One particular source of confusion that can arise here is the fact that can be used as an adverb

before

to give it emphasis, as in:

We also must be sure not to use with a countable noun, nor with an uncountable noun.

Fewer vs. Less

The conventional rule regarding is that we use with countable nouns and with uncountable nouns. For example:

The rule carries over when we add words to an uncountable noun to make a countable phrase (as we looked at above). We can see this distinction in the following examples:

Measurements of distance, time, and amount

As we noted above, measurements of distance, time, or amount for nouns that we would normally consider countable (and thus plural) end up taking singular verbs. Likewise, these terms also take the word , most often in the construction . For example:

  • $20,000 is we expected to pay.”
  • “We walked 50 miles to get here.”
  • “We have two hours to finish this project.”
  • “I weigh 20 pounds I used to.”

Note, however, that we generally can’t use

before

these kinds of nouns:

is also used with countable nouns in the construction , as in:

  • “That is problem to worry about.”

can also be used (albeit less commonly), but the construction usually changes to , as in:

  • “That is one problem to worry about.”

Rule or non-rule?

It is important to note that many grammar guides dispute the necessity of this supposed “rule,” referencing that it was in fact implemented as a stylistic preference by the 1770 grammarian Robert Baker, and that and had been used interchangeably for countable and uncountable nouns for hundreds of years before that. Specifically, it is considered by some as acceptable to use with countable nouns, especially in informal or colloquial writing and speech.

As long as the sentence does not sound awkward, it is probably safe to do so. However, many still regard the rule as indisputable, so it is recommended to adhere to the rule for professional, formal, or academic writing.

Nouns that are both countable and uncountable

The general idea of countable versus uncountable nouns is simple. If something can be counted with numbers, then it is countable, as the name suggests; if not, then it is uncountable.

However, words in English often carry a number of different meanings, and these can affect whether a word will be considered countable in one instance compared to another.

Take, for instance, the following example featuring the abstract noun :

  • “He’s just looking for love.”

This is a clear instance of an uncountable noun. The abstract idea of love cannot be counted with numbers and is thus uncountable. However, the word can also mean “a person or thing one loves.” When carrying this particular meaning, is countable. For example:

  • “I have loves in my life: my wife and my work.”

Likewise, many things we would normally consider to be countable have meanings that render them countable. For instance:

  • “How many stones did they use to build this wall?” (countable—This refers to individual stones.)
  • “This tablet is made of stone.” (uncountable— in this sense refers to the

    material

    that composes the ; substances and materials are countable.)

Because the concrete noun has a subtly different meaning in these two different sentences, it is considered countable in one and uncountable in the other. Let’s look at some common examples to help reinforce the concept:

  • “She doesn’t like hearing any criticism.” (uncountable—the act of making a critical comment or judgment)
  • “I have criticismsto share.” (countable—individual critical comments or judgments)
  • “How many chickens does your uncle own?” (countable—individual live chickens)
  • “I think I’ll have chicken for dinner.” (uncountable—the meat of the chicken as a substance or material)
  • “We must all strive to avoid sin.” (uncountable—the idea or concept of sin itself)
  • “The politician has too many sins to count on one hand.” (countable—individual acts or instances of sin)

These are just a few examples of nouns that can be both countable and uncountable, depending on context and specific meaning. There are far, far too many to list every single one here, so you simply have to know which meaning a word carries in a given context and decide whether that meaning makes the noun countable or uncountable.

Quiz

1. Which article can be used with uncountable nouns?

a) a
b) an
c) the
d) A & B

2. What verb form is generally used with uncountable nouns?

a) singular
b) plural
c) singular in the past tense only
d) plural in the past tense only

3. Which of the following is an uncountable noun?

a) person
b) friend
c) intelligent
d) news

4. Which of the following is not an uncountable noun?

a) love
b) piece
c) wood
d) water

5. Which of the following sentences is correct?

a) “We are waiting for a news.”
b) “You can never have too many love.”
c) “These homeworks are very hard.”
d) “Could I have less water, please?”


Countable and Uncountable Nouns in English for Smart Kids and Teachers Online classes with Pictures


Countable and uncountable nouns
It’s important to distinguish between countable and uncountable nouns in English because their usage is different in regards to both determiners and verbs.
Countable nouns
Countable nouns are for things we can count using numbers. They have a singular and a plural form. The singular form can use the determiner \”a\” or \”an\”. If you want to ask about the quantity of a countable noun, you ask \”How many?\” combined with the plural countable noun.
Singular Plural
one dog two dogs
one horse two horses
one man two men
one idea two ideas
one shop two shops
Examples
She has three dogs.
I own a house.
I would like two books please.
How many friends do you have?
Uncountable nouns
Uncountable nouns are for the things that we cannot count with numbers. They may be the names for abstract ideas or qualities or for physical objects that are too small or too amorphous to be counted (liquids, powders, gases, etc.). Uncountable nouns are used with a singular verb. They usually do not have a plural form.
Examples
tea
sugar
water
air
rice
knowledge
beauty
anger
fear
love
money
research
safety
evidence
We cannot use a/an with these nouns. To express a quantity of an uncountable noun, use a word or expression like some, a lot of, much, a bit of, a great deal of , or else use an exact measurement like a cup of, a bag of, 1kg of, 1L of, a handful of, a pinch of, an hour of, a day of. If you want to ask about the quantity of an uncountable noun, you ask \”How much?\”
Examples
There has been a lot of research into the causes of this disease.
He gave me a great deal of advice before my interview.
Can you give me some information about uncountable nouns?
He did not have much sugar left.
Measure 1 cup of water, 300g of flour, and 1 teaspoon of salt.
How much rice do you want?
Tricky spots
Some nouns are countable in other languages but uncountable in English. They must follow the rules for uncountable nouns. The most common ones are:
accommodation, advice, baggage, behavior, bread, furniture, information, luggage, news, progress, traffic, travel, trouble, weather, work
Examples
I would like to give you some advice.
How much bread should I bring?
I didn’t make much progress today.
This looks like a lot of trouble to me.
We did an hour of work yesterday.
Be careful with the noun hair which is normally uncountable in English, so it is not used in the plural. It can be countable only when referring to individual hairs.
Examples
She has long blond hair.
The child’s hair was curly.
I washed my hair yesterday.
My father is getting a few grey hairs now. (refers to individual hairs)
I found a hair in my soup! (refers to a single strand of hair)

In English grammar, words that refer to people, places, or things are called nouns. They can be classified in many ways.
One way to classify nouns is according to whether they can be counted or not. Many English mistakes are related to this point. By reading through this page, you will understand:
what countable and uncountable nouns are
how to use them correctly in a sentence
Countable (or count) nouns are words which can be counted. They have a singular form and a plural form. They usually refer to things. Most countable nouns become plural by adding an ‘s’ at the end of the word.
For example:
Singular Plural
chair chairs
bottle bottles
student students
Uncountable (or noncount) nouns are words which cannot be counted. Therefore, they only have a singular form. They have no plural forms. These words are thought of as wholes rather than as parts. They usually refer to abstractions (such as confidence or advice) or collectives (such as equipment or luggage).
For example:
Singular
money
furniture
information
List of Uncountable Nouns (These are sample uncountable nouns only! There are many more.)
General
homework
equipment
luggage
clothing
furniture
machinery
gold
silver
cotton
glass
jewelery
perfume
soap
paper
wood
petrol
gasoline
baggage
hair
traffic
Abstract
advice
help
fun
recreation
enjoyment
information
knowledge
news
patience
happiness
progress
confidence
courage
education
intelligence
space
energy
laughter
peace
pride
Food
food
flour
meat
rice
cake
bread
ice cream
cheese
toast
pasta
spaghetti
butter
oil
honey
soup
fish
fruit
salt
tea
coffee
Weather
thunder
lightning
snow
rain
sleet
ice
heat
humidity
hail
wind
light
darkness
Languages
English
Portuguese
Hindi
Arabic
Japanese
Korean
Spanish
French
Russian
Italian
Hebrew
Chinese
Subjects/Fields
mathematics
economics
physics
ethics
civics
art
architecture
music
photography
grammar
chemistry
history
commerce
engineering
politics
sociology
psychology
vocabulary
archaeology
poetry
Sports
golf
tennis
baseball
basketball
soccer
football
cricket
hockey
rugby
chess
poker
bridge
Activities
swimming
walking
driving
jogging
reading
writing
listening
speaking
cooking
sleeping
studying
working
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Countable and  Uncountable Nouns in English for Smart Kids and Teachers Online classes with Pictures

Countable and uncountable nouns: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 27


Welcome to the Grammar Gameshow! Test your knowledge in this crazy quiz! The presenter is a bit strange, the points don’t make sense and the prizes could use some improvement, but at least the grammar is correct!
Bill reigns supreme! This will be his fourth game in a row! He could very well become the next champion. This time he and his fellow contestant Yun will be tested on their knowledge of countable and uncountable nouns. That extremely complicated set of rules that tell us about the people things and places we are talking about! Can they win through? Why does Yun keep looking up her sleeve? Can Bill convince Will that something strange is going on? Find out all in this episode of the Grammar Gameshow!
For more information, a quiz and other episodes, visit:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/tgg/unit1/session28
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We like receiving and reading your comments please use English when you comment.
For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com

Countable and uncountable nouns: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 27

Mother’s Love – How’s the weather? (Weather) – English cartoon story


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Mother’s Love How’s the weather? English story for Kids
English Singsing! Learn English with stories.
This video in story category is that reconstruct famous fairy tale’s contents.
Subscribe to our channel, and you can find some more fun and exciting animation.
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Title : How’s the weather
Mother : How’s the weather?
Neighbor1: It’s raining.
Mother: Oh, no.
Mother: How’s the weather?
Neighbor2: It’s sunny.
Mother: Oh, no.
Neighbor3: Look, it’s raining.
Mother: Okay, sounds good.
Neighbor3: It’s sunny now.
Mother: That’s good.

Thanks for checking out the \”English Singsing\”.
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Mother's Love - How's the weather? (Weather) - English cartoon story

Countable and Uncountable Nouns


Learn the difference between countable and uncountable nouns with this video.

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Uncountable Nouns – English Grammar Lesson


Do you know the difference between countable and uncountable nouns? The basic difference is quite simple, but this topic still needs attention. Often, countable and uncountable nouns are different in different languages. Also, some nouns can be both countable and uncountable with different meanings! We’ll look at these ideas in this lesson, and you can see how uncountable nouns work in English. Learn more with a certified English teacher: http://bit.ly/ooeteachers.
What’s the difference between paper and a paper? Why do we say trousers are… but news is…? Why can’t you say, ‘Can you give me an advice’?
You’ll learn the answers to all these questions in this lesson.
See the full version of this free lesson here:
https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/uncountablenouns
Contents:
1. A basic guide to uncountable nouns 0:40
2. Which nouns are uncountable? 4:06
3. Nouns can be countable and uncountable 7:09
4. Some other strange nouns 12:39
5. Making uncountable nouns countable 16:09
In this lesson you can learn:
The basic rules of uncountable nouns.
How to tell which nouns are uncountable.
How some nouns can be both countable and uncountable.
About uncountable nouns that are always in the plural form.
Ways to make uncountable nouns countable.
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Uncountable Nouns - English Grammar Lesson

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