Home » [Update] What Are Adjectives? | คำ adjectives – NATAVIGUIDES

[Update] What Are Adjectives? | คำ adjectives – NATAVIGUIDES

คำ adjectives: นี่คือโพสต์ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับหัวข้อนี้

What Are Adjectives?

Adjectives are words that describe nouns (or pronouns). “Old,” “green,” and “cheerful” are examples of adjectives. (It might be useful to think of adjectives as “describing words.”)

This infographic shows where an adjective sits in relation to the noun it describes:

Got it? Take a quick test.

Got it? Take a quick test.

Examples of Adjectives

Here are some examples of adjectives. (In each example, the adjective is highlighted.)

Adjective Before the Noun

An adjective usually comes directly before the noun it describes (or “modifies,” as grammarians say).

  • old

    man

  • green

    coat

  • cheerful

    one

  • (“One” is a pronoun. Don’t forget that adjectives modify pronouns too.)

When adjectives are used like this, they’re called attributive adjectives.

Adjective After the Noun

An adjective can come after the noun.

  • Jack was

    old

    .

  • It looks

    green

    .

  • He seems

    cheerful

    .

In the three examples above, the adjectives follow

Adjective Immediately After the Noun

Sometimes, an adjective comes immediately after a noun.

  • the Princess

    Royal

  • time

    immemorial

  • body

    beautiful

  • the best seats

    available

  • the worst manners

    imaginable

When adjectives are used like this, they’re called postpositive adjectives. Postpositive adjectives are more common with pronouns.

  • someone

    interesting

  • those

    present

  • something

    evil

A Video Summary

Here is a video summarizing this lesson on adjectives.

Adjectives are words that describe nouns (or pronouns). “Old,” “green,” and “cheerful” are examples of adjectives. (It might be useful to think of adjectives as “describing words.”)This infographic shows where an adjective sits in relation to the noun it describes:Here are some examples of adjectives. (In each example, the adjective is highlighted.)An adjective usually comes directlythe noun it describes (or “modifies,” as grammarians say).When adjectives are used like this, they’re calledAn adjective can comethe noun.In the three examples above, the adjectives follow linking verbs (“was,” “looks,” and “seems”) to describe the noun or pronoun. (When adjectives are used like this, they’re called predicative adjectives .)Sometimes, an adjective comesa noun.When adjectives are used like this, they’re called. Postpositive adjectives are more common with pronouns.Here is a video summarizing this lesson on adjectives.

Got it? Take a quick test.

Got it? Take a quick test.

More about Adjectives

Descriptive Adjectives and Determiners

In traditional grammar, words like “his,” “this,” “many,” and even “a” and “the” are classified as adjectives. However, in contemporary grammar, such words are classified as

CategoryExample
Appearanceattractive, burly, clean, dusty
Colourazure, blue, cyan, dark
Conditionabsent, broken, careful, dead
Personalityannoying, brave, complex, dizzy
Quantityample, bountiful, countless, deficient
Sensearomatic, bitter, cold, deafening
Size and Shapeangular, broad, circular, deep
Timeancient, brief, concurrent, daily

The rise of determiners means that we now have nine
Traditional GrammarContemporary Grammar

  • Adjectives
  • Adverbs
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections
  • Nouns
  • Prepositions
  • Pronouns
  • Verbs
  • Adjectives
  • Adverbs
  • Conjunctions
  • Determiners
  • Interjections
  • Nouns
  • Prepositions
  • Pronouns
  • Verbs
  • Read more about determiners.

    The Difference between Adjectives and Determiners

    For centuries, the term “adjective” has been used for a word type now called a most people, but this situation is changing quickly [

    Determiners indicate qualities such as the following:

    • Possession (e.g., “

      my

      dog”)

    • Specificity (e.g., “

      that

      dog”)

    • Quantity (e.g., “

      one

      dog”)

    • Definiteness (e.g., “

      a

      dog”)

    The Four Main Differences between Adjectives and Determiners

    Regardless of whether you use the word “determiner” or “adjective” for such words, this much is true: determiners are not like descriptive adjectives. Here are the four main differences between determiners and normal adjectives:

    (Difference 1) A determiner cannot have a comparative form.

    • Descriptive adjective: pretty > prettier
    • (“Prettier” is the comparative form of “pretty.”)

    • Determiner: that > [nothing fits here]
    • (There is no comparative form.)

    (Difference 2) A determiner often cannot be removed from the sentence.

    • Descriptive adjectives removed: The young boy stole a silver watch.
    • (This is grammatically sound with the normal adjectives removed.)

    • Determiner: The Young boy stole a silver watch.
    • (The sentence is flawed with the determiners removed.)

    (Difference 3) A determiner often refers back to something (i.e., it’s like a pronoun).

    • Determiner: Release those prisoners immediately.
    • (The determiner “those” refers back to something previously mentioned. In other words, it has an antecedent (the thing it refers to). Descriptive adjectives do not have an antecedent.)

    (Difference 4) A determiner cannot be used as a subject complement.

    • Descriptive adjective: She is intelligent.
    • (The descriptive adjective “intelligent” can be used after a linking verb (here, “is”) and function as a subject complement.)

    • Determiner: She is [nothing fits here].
    • (You can’t use a determiner as a subject complement. NB: If you think you’ve found a determiner that fits, then you’ve found a pronoun not a determiner.)

    Here is a brief description of the main determiners. (There is a separate page on each one.)

    TypeExamples
    Possessive Determiners. The possessive determiners (called “possessive adjectives” in traditional grammar) are “my,” “your,” “his,” “her,” “its,” “our,” “their,” and “whose.” A possessive determiner sits before a noun (or a pronoun) to show who (or what) owns it.

  • When a man opens a car door for

    his

    wife, it’s either a new car or a new wife. (Prince Philip)

  • The only time a wife listens to

    her

    husband is when he’s asleep. (Cartoonist Chuck Jones)

  • Read more about possessive determiners/adjectives.

    Demonstrative Determiners. The demonstrative determiners (called “demonstrative adjectives” in traditional grammar) are “this,” “that,” “these,” and “those.” A demonstrative determiner makes a noun (or a pronoun) more specific by relating it to something previously mentioned or something being demonstrated.

  • That

    man’s silence is wonderful to listen to. (Novelist Thomas Hardy)

  • Maybe

    this

    world is another planet’s hell. (Writer Aldous Huxley)

  • Read more about demonstrative determiners/adjectives.

    Articles. The articles are the words “a,” “an,” and “the.” They are used to define whether something is specific or unspecific.

  • The

    poets are only

    the

    interpreters of

    the

    gods. (Philosopher Socrates)

  • I’m

    an

    optimist – but

    an

    optimist who carries

    a

    raincoat. (Prime Minister Harold Wilson)

  • Read more about the articles.

    Numbers (or Cardinal Numbers). The cardinal numbers are “one,” “two,” “three,” etc. (as opposed by “first,” “second,” “third,” etc., which are known as ordinal numbers). Cardinal numbers are used to specify quantity. They are part of the group of determiners known as “quantifiers.”

  • If

    two

    wrongs don’t make a right, try

    three

    wrongs. (Canadian educator Laurence Peter)

  • One

    loyal friend is worth

    ten thousand

    relatives. (Greek Tragedian Euripides)

  • Read more about “quantifiers” on the determiners page.

    Indefinite Determiners. The most common indefinite determiners (called “indefinite adjectives” in traditional grammar) are “no,” “any,” “many,” “few,” “several,” and “some.” Indefinite determiners modify nouns in a non-specific way usually relating to quantity. Like numbers, they are part of the group of determiners known as “quantifiers.”

  • If you live to be one hundred, you’ve got it made. Very

    few

    people die past that age. (Comedian George Burns)

  • If this is coffee, please bring me

    some

    tea; but if this is tea, please bring me

    some

    coffee. (US President Abraham Lincoln)

  • Read more about indefinite determiners/adjectives.

    Interrogative Determiners. The most common interrogative determiners (called “interrogative adjectives” in traditional grammar) are “which,” “what,” and “whose.” They are used to ask questions.

  • If you decide that you’re indecisive,

    which

    one are you?

  • What

    hair colour do they put on bald person’s driving licence?

  • Read more about interrogative determiners/adjectives.

    Nouns Used as Adjectives

    Many words that are usually nouns can function as adjectives. For example:

    • autumn

      colours

    • boat

      race

    • computer

      shop

    • Devon

      cream

    • electricity

      board

    • fruit

      fly

    Here are some real-life examples:

    • Not all

      face

      masks are created equal. (Entrepreneur Hannah Bronfman)

    • You cannot make a revolution with

      silk

      gloves. (Premier Joseph Stalin)

    When used like adjectives, nouns are known as attributive nouns.

    Participles Used as Adjectives

    Formed from a verb, a

    • The present participle (ending -“ing”)
    • The past participle (usually ending -“ed,” -“d,” -“t,” -“en,” or -“n”)

    Here are some examples of participles as adjectives:

    • The most

      exciting

      phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not “Eureka!” but “That’s funny.” (Writer Isaac Asimov)

    • Always be wary of any helpful item that weighs less than its

      operating

      manual. (Author Terry Pratchett)

    • While the

      spoken

      word can travel faster, you can’t take it home in your hand. Only the

      written

      word can be absorbed wholly at the convenience of the reader. (Educator Kingman Brewster)

    • We all have friends and

      loved

      ones who say 60 is the new 30. No, it’s the new 60. (Fashion model Iman)

    A participle is classified as a

    Infinitives Used as Adjectives

    An

    • No human creature can give orders

      to love

      . (French novelist George Sand)
      (Here, the infinitive “to love” describes the noun “orders.”)

    • Progress is man’s ability

      to complicate simplicity

      . (Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl)

    • (An infinitive will often head its own phrase. Here, the infinitive phrase “to complicate simplicity” describes the noun “ability.”)

    Read more about infinitive verbs.

    All the Parts of Speech

    Here is a video for beginners that summarizes all the parts of speech.

    In traditional grammar, words like “his,” “this,” “many,” and even “a” and “the” are classified as adjectives. However, in contemporary grammar, such words are classified as determiners (see below). Be aware that, for many people, the word adjective refers only to descriptive adjectives. A descriptive adjective will usually fit into one of the following categories:The rise of determiners means that we now have nine parts of speech not the traditional eight.For centuries, the term “adjective” has been used for a word type now called a determiner . For example, the words “his,” “this,” “many” are classified as possessive adjective demonstrative adjective , and indefinite adjective respectively. In contemporary grammar, however, these are classified as determiners, specifically possessive determiner, demonstrative determiner, and indefinite determiner. Of interest, such determiners are still classified as adjectives by, but this situation is changing quickly [ evidence ].)Determiners indicate qualities such as the following:Regardless of whether you use the word “determiner” or “adjective” for such words, this much is true: determiners are not like descriptive adjectives. Here are the four main differences between determiners and normal adjectives:Here is a brief description of the main determiners. (There is a separate page on each one.)Many words that are usually nouns can function as adjectives. For example:Here are some real-life examples:When used like adjectives, nouns are known asFormed from a verb, a participle is a word that can be used as an adjective. There are two types of participle:Here are some examples of participles as adjectives:A participle is classified as a verbal (a verb form that functions as a noun or an adjective).An infinitive verb (e.g., “to run,” “to jump”) can also function as an adjective.Here is a video for beginners that summarizes

    The Order of Adjectives

    When two or more adjectives are strung together, they should be ordered according to the following list:

    PlacementType of AdjectiveExamples
    1

  • Article,
  • Demonstrative Determiner, or
  • Possessive Determiner
  • a, an, the
  • this, that, those, these
  • my, your, his, our
  • 2Quantityone, three, ninety-nine
    3Opinion or Observationbeautiful, clever, witty, well-mannered
    4Sizebig, medium-sized, small
    5Physical Qualitythin, lumpy, cluttered
    6Shapesquare, round, long
    7Ageyoung, middle-aged, old
    8Colour/Colorred, blue, purple
    9Origin or ReligionFrench, Buddhist
    10Material metal, leather, wooden
    11Type L-shaped, two-sided, all-purpose
    12

  • Purpose, or
  • Attributive Noun
  • mixing, drinking, cooking
  • service, football, head
  • Here is an example of a 14-adjective string (shaded) that is ordered correctly:

    • my two lovely XL thin tubular new white Spanish metallic hinged correcting knee

      braces.

    Regardless of how many adjectives are used (more than 3 is rare), the established order is still followed.

    • That’s

      a lovely mixing

      bowl

    • (1: Determiner 2: Opinion 3: Purpose)

    • Who’s nicked my

      two black, wooden

      spoons?

    • (1: Number 2: Colour 3: Material)

    • Give your ticket to

      the Italian old

      waiter.

    • (Age comes before origin. Therefore, “the old Italian waiter” would have been better.)

    This list of precedence is not universally agreed, but all versions are similar. The area of most dispute is age and shape. The order can change for emphasis too. If there were two old waiters, one Italian and one Spanish, then the wrong example above would be correct, and the word “Italian” would be emphasized.

    If you’re a native English speaker, you are safe to ignore this list and let your instinct guide you. (Remarkably, you already know this, even if you don’t know you know it.)

    Using Commas with a List of Adjectives

    In order to understand when to use commas between multiple adjectives, you must learn the difference between cumulative adjectives and coordinate adjectives.

    With cumulative adjectives, specificity builds with each adjective, so you cannot separate cumulative adjectives with commas, and they must follow the order of precedence in the table above. Coordinate adjectives are different. They describe the noun independently, which means they can follow any order. Coordinate adjectives should be separated with commas or the word “and.” Here are some examples of each type:

    Cumulative adjectives:

    • A bright green metal mixing bowl
    • (These are cumulative adjectives. Their order cannot be changed. They follow the precedent list. There are no commas.)

    Coordinate adjectives:

    • A green, lumpy bowl
    • A lumpy, green bowl
    • (These are coordinate adjectives. As shown, their order can be changed. They should be separated with commas or the word “and.”)

    Read more about the order of adjectives and punctuating them.

    Compound Adjectives

    Not all adjectives are single words. Often, a single adjective will consist of two or more words. A single adjective with more than one word is called a

    • Happiness is having a large, loving, caring,

      close-knit

      family in another city. (Comedian George Burns)

    • Be a

      good-looking

      corpse. Leave a

      good-looking

      tattoo. (Actor Ed Westwick)

    • I like the

      busted-nose

      look. (Actor Peter Dinklage)

    Compound adjectives are usually grouped with

    Read more about compound adjectives.

    Adjective Phrases

    In real-life sentences, adjectives are often accompanied by

    • My bankers are

      very happy with me

      . (The popstar formerly known as Prince)

    • (In this example, the adjective phrase describes “bankers.”)

    • The dragonfly is an

      exceptionally beautiful

      insect but a fierce carnivore.

    • (Here, the adjective phrase describes “insect.”)

    Here’s a more formal definition:

    Formal Definition for Adjective Phrase

    An adjective phrase is a group of words headed by an adjective that describes a noun.

    Read more about adjective phrases.

    Adjective Clauses

    The last thing to say about adjectives is that

    • The people

      who make history

      are not the people

      who make it

      but the people

      who make it and then write about it

      . (Musician Julian Cope)

    • I live in that solitude

      which is painful in youth but delicious in the years of maturity

      . (Physicist Albert Einstein)

    • (It can start getting complicated. In the adjective clause above, “painful in youth” and “delicious in the years of maturity” are adjective phrases.)

    Here’s a formal definition:

    Formal Definition for Adjective Clause

    An adjective clause is a multi-word adjective that includes a subject and a verb.

    Read more about adjective clauses.

    Why Should I Care about Adjectives?

    This section covers a lot of adjective-associated terms, most of which have their own pages that highlight their quirks and issues. Below are five top-level points linked to adjectives.

    (Point 1) Reduce your wordcount with the right adjective.

    Try to avoid using words like “very” and “extremely” to modify adjectives. Pick better adjectives.

    • very happy boy > delighted boy
    • very angry > livid
    • extremely posh hotel > luxurious hotel
    • really serious look > stern look

    The examples above are not wrong, but they are not succinct. The best writing is precise and concise.

    (Point 2) Reduce your wordcount by removing adjectives.

    Picking the right noun can eliminate the need for an adjective.

    • whaling ship > whaler
    • disorderly crowd > mob
    • organized political dissenting group > faction

    You can also reduce your wordcount by removing redundant adjectives.

    • joint cooperation > cooperation
    • necessary requirement > requirement
    • handwritten manuscript > manuscript

    The examples above are not wrong, but they are not succinct. The needless repetition of a single concept is known as

    (Point 3) Avoid incomprehensible strings of “adjectives.”

    In business writing (especially with technical subjects), it is not unusual to encounter strings of attributive nouns. In each example below, the attributive-noun string is shaded.

    • Factor in the

      service level agreement completion

      time. (difficult to understand)

    • Engineers will install the

      email retrieval process improvement

      software. (difficult)

    • He heads the

      network services provision

      team. (difficult)

    • The system needs a

      remote encryption setting

      reset. (difficult)

    Noun strings like these are difficult to follow. If you use one, you will almost certainly bring the reading flow of your readers to a screeching halt as they stop to unpick the meaning, or, worse, they’ll zone out and skim over your words without understanding them.

    To avoid such barely intelligible noun strings, do one or all of the following:

    • Completely rearrange the sentence.
    • Convert one of the nouns to a verb.
    • Use hyphens to highlight the compound adjectives.

    Here are the reworked sentences:

    • Factor in the time to complete the service-level agreement. (better)
    • Engineers will install the software to improve the email-retrieval process. (better)
    • He heads the team providing network services. (better)
    • The system needs a reset of the remote-encryption setting. (better)

    (Point 4) Don’t complete a linking verb with an adverb.

    Most writers correctly use an adjective after a linking verb.

    • It tastes nice. It smells nice. It seems nice. By Jove, it is nice.

    There’s an issue though. For some, the linking verb “to feel” doesn’t feel like a linking verb and, knowing that adverbs modify verbs, they use an adverb.

    • I feel badly for letting you down.
    • (“Badly” is an adverb. It should be “bad.”)

    This error happens with other linking verbs too, but it’s most common with “to feel.”

    • Bad service and food tasted awfully. (Title of an online restaurant review by “Vanessa”)
    • (“Awfully” is an adverb. It should be “awful.”)

    (Point 5) Use postpositive adjectives for emphasis.

    Putting an adjective immediately after a noun (i.e., using the adjective postpositively) is a technique for creating emphasis. (The deliberate changing of normal word order for emphasis is called

    • I suppressed my thoughts

      sinful and revengeful

      .

    • The sea

      stormy and perilous

      steadily proceeded.

    Key Points

    • Go concise by going precise.
    • Improve sentence flow by avoiding long attributive-noun strings.
    • Don’t say you feel badly unless you’re bad at feeling stuff.
    • Use an adjective postpositively to create a thought everlasting.


    Ready for the Test?

    Here is a confirmatory test for this lesson.

    This test can also be:

    • Edited (i.e., you can delete questions and play with the order of the questions).
    • Printed to create a handout.
    • Sent electronically to friends or students.

    Here is afor this lesson.This test can also be:

    When two or more adjectives are strung together, they should be ordered according to the following list:Here is an example of a 14-adjective string (shaded) that is ordered correctly:Regardless of how many adjectives are used (more than 3 is rare), the established order is still followed.This list of precedence is not universally agreed, but all versions are similar. The area of most dispute is age and shape. The order can change for emphasis too. If there were two old waiters, one Italian and one Spanish, then the wrong example above would be correct, and the word “Italian” would be emphasized.If you’re a native English speaker, you are safe to ignore this list and let your instinct guide you. (Remarkably, you already know this, even if you don’t know you know it.)In order to understand when to use commas between multiple adjectives, you must learn the difference between cumulative adjectives and coordinate adjectives.With cumulative adjectives, specificity builds with each adjective, so you cannot separate cumulative adjectives with commas, and they must follow the order of precedence in the table above. Coordinate adjectives are different. They describe the noun independently, which means they can follow any order. Coordinate adjectives should be separated with commas or the word “and.” Here are some examples of each type:Not all adjectives are single words. Often, a single adjective will consist of two or more words. A single adjective with more than one word is called a compound adjective . For example:Compound adjectives are usually grouped with hyphens to show they are one adjective.In real-life sentences, adjectives are often accompanied by modifiers like adverbs (e.g., “very,” “extremely”) and prepositional phrases (e.g., “…with me,” “…about the man”). In other words, an adjective (shown in bold) will often feature in an “adjective phrase” (shaded).Here’s a more formal definition:The last thing to say about adjectives is that clauses can also function as adjectives. With an adjective clause, the clause is linked to the noun being described with a relative pronoun (“who,” “whom,” “whose,” “that,” or “which”) or a relative adverb (“when,” “where,” or “why”). Like all clauses, it will have a subject and a verb.Here’s a formal definition:This section covers a lot of adjective-associated terms, most of which have their own pages that highlight their quirks and issues. Below are five top-level points linked to adjectives.Try to avoid using words like “very” and “extremely” to modify adjectives. Pick better adjectives.The examples above are not wrong, but they are not succinct. The best writing is precise and concise.Picking the right noun can eliminate the need for an adjective.You can also reduce your wordcount by removing redundant adjectives.The examples above are not wrong, but they are not succinct. The needless repetition of a single concept is known as tautology In business writing (especially with technical subjects), it is not unusual to encounter strings of attributive nouns. In each example below, the attributive-noun string is shaded.Noun strings like these are difficult to follow. If you use one, you will almost certainly bring the reading flow of your readers to a screeching halt as they stop to unpick the meaning, or, worse, they’ll zone out and skim over your words without understanding them.To avoid such barely intelligible noun strings, do one or all of the following:Here are the reworked sentences:Most writers correctly use an adjective after a linking verb.There’s an issue though. For some, the linking verb “to feel” doesn’t feel like a linking verb and, knowing that adverbs modify verbs, they use an adverb.This error happens with other linking verbs too, but it’s most common with “to feel.”Putting an adjective immediately after a noun (i.e., using the adjective postpositively) is a technique for creating emphasis. (The deliberate changing of normal word order for emphasis is called anastrophe .)

    [Update] หลักการใช้ ADJECTIVES และ VERB+ADJECTIVE | คำ adjectives – NATAVIGUIDES

    ADJECTIVES
    adjective ออกเสียง แอ็ดจิกทิฟวฺ
    *adjective คือ คำคุณศัพท์ ใช้เพื่อขยายหรือให้รายละเอียดเพิ่มเกี่ยวกับคน สัตว์ สิ่งของ สถานที่ ฯลฯ
    หลักการใช้
    1. ตำแหน่งของคุณศัพท์
    ภายในประโยค คำคุณศัพท์มีตำแหน่งการวางได้ 3 จุดคือ
    (1) คุณศัพท์ขยายนาม ในกรณีนี้คำคุณศัพท์วางไว้หน้าคำนาม แสดงว่าเป็นคำขยายคำนามนั่นเอง เช่น
    adjective            noun
    a young            reporter
    an old            professor
    the funniest        game
    this narrow        canal
    his fierce            dog
    คุณศัพท์ขยายคำนามอาจจะมีมากกว่า 1 คำก็ได้ เช่น
    Adjectives        noun
    a thin young         reporter
    a handsome old     professor
    this very narrow     canal
    ตัวอย่าง
    “What happened to you last night ?”
    เกิดอะไรขึ้นกับคุณเมื่อคืน
    “I was bitten by a fierce dog.”
    นมถูกสุนัขที่ดุร้ายกัด
    “Whom did you talk to yesterday ?”
    คุณคุยกับใครเมื่อวานนี้
    “I talked to a thin young reporter.”
    ผมคุยกับนักข่าวหนุ่มร่างผอม
    2. คุณศัพท์อยู่หลังกริยา BE .ในกรณีนี้หน้าคุณศัพท์จะมี Verb to be เรียกหน้าที่ของคุณศัพท์แบบนี้ได้ว่า complement ซึ่งเป็นการบรรยายลักษณะของประธานของประโยค
    ตัวอย่าง
    “What’s your sister like?”
    น้องสาวของคุณมีรูปร่างลักษณะอน่างไร
    “She’s tall and slim.”
    หล่อนรูปร่างสูงและเอวบางร่างน้อย
    “Is she beautiful?”
    หล่อนสวยหรือเปล่า
    “No, but she’s clever.”
    ไม่ แต่หล่อนฉลาด
    “Is she married?”
    หล่อนแต่งงานแล้วยัง
    “No, she’s single.”
    ยัง หล่อนเป็นโสด
    3. คุณศัพท์อยู่หลัง LINKING VERBS ได้แก่ become, look, seem, feel, appear, stay, get (=become), sound, taste, remain
    ตัวอย่าง
    Our friends seem ready to help.
    เพื่อนของเราดูเหมือนว่าพร้อมจะให้การช่วยเหลือ
    The weather will stay fine for a few days.
    อากาศจะยังคงแจ่มใสต่อไปอีก 2 – 3 วัน
    He looks unhappy whenever he has to study.
    เขาดูไม่มีความสุขเมื่อใดก็ตามที่เขาต้องเรียน
    Bread is becoming expensive in this town.
    ขนมปังกำลังมีราคาแพงขึ้นในเมืองนี้
    This mango tastes sour.
    มะม่วงผลนี้รสชาติเปรี้ยว
    He still remains popular.
    เขายังคงเป็นที่รู้จักของผู้คน
    2. ตำแหน่งอื่นของคำคุณศัพท์
    นอกจากตำแหน่งตามปกติของคำคุณศัพท์ตามที่กล่าวมาในข้อ 1 แล้ว ยังมีบางกรณีที่คำคุณศัพท์วางในตำแหน่งที่ต่างไปจากกฎเกณฑ์ข้างบนคือ
    1. คุณศัพท์อยู่ท้าย the
    ลักษณะนี้พบได้ไนคำคุณศัพท์ที่ใช้เพื่อหมายถืงระดับขึ้นของคน (a class of people) เช่น
    the young         คนหนุ่มสาว
    the rich        คนร่ำรวย
    the old        คนชรา
    the employed     คนที่ได้รับการว่าจ้าง
    the unemployed     คนที่ไม่ได้รับการว่าจ้าง, คนว่างงาน
    the privileged     คนที่ได้สิทธิพิเศษ
    the poor        คนยากจน
    the blind        คนตาบอด
    the dumb        คนใบ้
    the Japanese     คนญี่ปุ่น
    the English     คนอังกฤษ
    ตัวอย่าง
    The rich should help the poor.
    คนรวยควรจะช่วยเหลือคนจน
    The young should look after the old.
    คนหนุ่มสาวควรจะดูแลคนชรา
    The employed are happier than the unemployed.
    คนที่ได้รับการว่าจ้างมีความสุขกว่าคนที่ไม่ได้รับการว่าจ้าง
    The English have a lot to learn from the Japanese.
    คนอังกฤษต้องเรียนรู้อีกมากจากคนญี่ปุ่น
    2. คุณศัพท์อยู่ท้ายกรรมของประโยค
    คุณศัพท์ที่ใช้ในกรณีนี้จะอยู่ท้ายกรรม (object) ของประโยค เรียกว่า object complement คำกริยาที่เกี่ยวข้องกับหลักเกณฑ์ข้อนี้ด้แก่ get, keep, make, find, paint, set, turn, wish, like
    ตัวอย่าง
    I like my coffee black.
    ผมซอบกาแฟดำ
    Don’t get your clothes dirty.
    อย่าทำให้เสื้อผ้าของคุณสกปรก
    My sister keeps her room tidy.
    น้องสาวรักษาห้องของเธอเป็นระเบียบเรียบร้อย
    They set the prisoners free.
    พวกเขาปลดปล่อยนักโทษเป็นอิสระ
    The cold weather turned the leaves red.
    อากาศหนาวทำให้ใบไม้เปลี่ยนเป็นสีแดง
    He wished himself dead.
    เขาอยากตาย
    We painted the door white.
    พวกเราทาสีประตูเป็นสีขาว
    I found the box empty.
    ผมพบกล่องว่างเปล่า
    3. คุณศัพท์อยู่ท้ายนามหรือสรรพนามที่มันขยาย
    สรรพนาม (pronouns) ที่ใช้ในกรณีนี้ได้จะต้องเป็น indefinite pronouns นั่นคือ สรรพนามที่ลงท้ายด้วย -body, -one, -thing
    ตัวอย่าง
    The chairman asked the people present at the meeting to express their views.
    = The chairman asked the people who were present at the meeting to express their views.
    ประธานได้ขอร้องให้ผู้เข้าประชุมแสดงความคิดเห็น
    The boys involved in the fight were sent away to another
    school.
    =The boys who were involved in the fight were sent away to another school.
    เด็กนักเรียนชายที่มีส่วนเกี่ยวข้องกับการตีกันถูกส่งไปเรียนโรงเรียนอื่น Mary hopes to marry someone rich.
    =Mary hopes to marry someone who is rich.
    แมรี่หวังที่จะแต่งงานกับคนที่ร่ำรวย
    Did you buy anything nice at the store?
    =Did you buy anything which is nice at the store?
    คุณซื้อสิ่งสวยๆ งามๆ ที่ร้านบ้างหรือเปล่า
    3. ลำดับของคุณศัพท์
    ท่านผู้อ่านอาจจะถามว่า ถ้าหากมีคุณศัพท์ที่ให้ข้อมูลต่างๆ นานาหลายคำ จะเรียงลำดับคุณศัพท์เหล่านี้ไว้หน้าคำนามอย่างไรจึงจะถูกต้อง อาทิ
    คุณศัพท์บอก
    ทัศนะความเห็น (opinion) เช่น beautiful, ugly
    ขนาด (size)    เช่น big, large, small
    รูปร่าง (shape)    เช่น thin, fat, slender
    สี (colour)        เช่น black, white, red
    อายุ (age)        เช่น old, new, ancient
    จุดกำเนิด (origin) เช่น French, Siamese, English
    จุดประสงค์ (purpose) เช่น shopping, running, jogging
    วัสดุ (material)    เช่น silk, plastic, wooden
    คำตอบ คือ ให้เรียงคุณศัพท์เหล่านี้ไว้หน้าคำนามดังนี้
    opinion —> size —> age —> shape —> colour—> origin —> material —> purpose —> NOUN
    ตัวอย่าง
    A tall Thai medical worker went abroad yesterday by Thai Airways.
    นักการแพทย์ชาวไทยร่างสูงคนหนึ่งได้เดินทางไปต่างประเทศเมื่อวานนี้ โดยสายการบินไทย
    “Do you see my old brown Persian horse ?”
    “No, I don’t.”
    คุณเห็นม้าพันธุ์เปอร์เซียสีนํ้าตาลตัวแก่ๆ ของผมไหม
    ไม่เห็นเลยครับ
    Come and see my small brown Japanese car.
    มาดูรถยนต์ญี่ปุ่นสีน้ำตาลคันเล็กของผมสิ
    4. มีคำคุณศัพท์บางคำ อาทิ asleep, alone, awake, afraid, ill, well คำคุณศัพท์เหล่านี้วางไว้หลังคำกริยา ไม่วางไว้หน้าคำนาม ซึ่งขัดกับการใช้คุณศัพท์ดังกล่าวมาเบื้องต้น คือ Adjective + Noun ฉะนั้นโครงสร้างประโยคที่มีคุณศัพท์ที่เอ่ยมาทั้ง 6 คำนี้ จึงต้องเป็น
    VERB + ADJECTIVE
    (โครงสร้างนี้บังคับใช้เฉพาะกับคำคุณศัพท์ทั้ง 6 คำในข้อ 4 เท่านั้น)
    ตัวอย่าง He is asleep.    เขานอนหลับ
    X He is an asleep man.
    We are alone.    เราอยู่กันตามลำพัง
    X We are alone people.
    These animals are alive.    สัตว์เหล่านี้ยังมีชีวิตอยู่
    X They are alive animals.
    หากจะนำเอาคำเหล่านี้มาวางไว้หน้าคำนาม (Adjective + Noun) จะต้องเปลี่ยนรูปคำเหล่านี้ใหม่กล่าวคือ ใช้
    sleeping         แทน         asleep     living    แทน     alive
    frightened     แทน         afraid     sick        แทน     ill
    healthy         แทน         well
    ตัวอย่าง Do you see that sleeping man?
    คุณเห็นผู้ชายคนที่กำลังหลับนั่นไหม
    Sick children cannot go to school.
    เด็กที่ป่วยไม่สามารถไปโรงเรียนได้
    Healthy people are happy.
    คนที่สุขภาพดีมีความสุข
    Easily frightened animals die young.
    สัตว์ที่ขี้กลัวง่ายตายเร็ว
    Living animals are fighting for survival.
    สัตว์ที่มีชีวิตต่อสู้เพื่อความอยู่รอด
    5. กรณีของหน่วยวัด
    ในกรณีของหน่วยวัด (units of measurement) คำคุณศัพท์ผสม (compound adjectives คอมพาวดฺ แอ็ดเจ็กทิฟสฺ) ที่เป็นหน่วยวัดเหล่านี้ มักวางไว้หน้าคำนาม ได้แก่
    อายุ (age)     เช่น a three-year-old building (อาคารอายุ 3 ปี)
    ปริมาตร (volume) เช่น a two-litre car (รถยนต์จุน้ำมัน 2 ลิตร)
    ความยาว (length) เช่น a twelve-inch ruler (ไม้บรรทัดความยาว 12 นิ้ว)
    ราคา (price) เช่น a fifty-baht shirt (เสื้อเชิ้ต ราคา 50 บาท)
    น้ำหนัก (weight) เช่น a five-kilo bag (ถุงบรรจุ 5 กิโล)
    พื้นที่ (area)    เช่น a twenty-rai farm (ฟาร์ม เนื้อที่ 20 ไร่)
    ระยะเวลา (duration) เช่น a four-hour meeting (การประชุม ที่ใช้เวลา 4 ชั่วโมง)
    ความลึก (depth) เช่น a six-foot hole (หลุมลึก 6 ฟุต)
    เวลา (time)    เช่น a five-hour walk
    (การเดินที่ใช้เวลา 5 ชั่วโมง)
    ระยะทาง (distance) เช่น a twenty-kilometre run (การวิ่งระยะทาง 20 กิโลเมตร)
    ตัวอย่าง
    She’s a seventyTyear-old woman. (1)
    =The woman is seventy years old. (2)
    หญิงคนนี้อายุ 70 ปี
    It is a twelve-inch ruler.
    =The ruler is twelve inches long.
    ไม้บรรทัดยาว 12 นิ้ว
    6. รูปของคำคุณศัพท์
    การสังเกตว่าคำนั้นๆ จะเป็นคำคุณศัพท์หรือไม่ ให้คำนึงถึงหลักเกณฑ์ดังนี้
    1. คำคุณศัพท์จำนวนมากสังเกตได้จากส่วนประกอบท้ายคำ (suffixes)
    ได้แก่

    Suffixes

    Adjectives

     

    -al

    actual

    physical

    แท้จริง

    ทางกายภาพ

    Final

    special

    ท้ายสุด

    พิเศษ

    -ent

    ancient

    urgent

    โบราณ

    ด่วน

    frequent

    excellent

    บ่อย

    ดีเลิศ

    -ous

    famous

    various

    มีชื่อเสียง

    หลายหลาย

    serious

    conscious

    เคร่งเครียด

    รู้สึกตัว

    -ic

    basic

    electric

    พื้นฐาน

    ทางไฟฟ้า

    atomic

    heroic

    ด้านอะตอม

    เป็นวีรบุรุษ

    -y

    angry

    hungry

    โกรธ

    หิว

    dirty

    funny

     

    สกปรก

    น่าขัน

    -ive

    active

    attractive

    กระฉับกระเฉง

    มีเสน่ห์

    expensive

    sensitive

    แพง

    รู้สึกไว

    -ed

    excited

    related

    ตื่นเต้น

    เกี่ยวพัน

    limited

    confused

    จำกัด

    สับสน

    -ble

    possible

    sensible

    เป็นไปได้

    มีเหตุผล

    probable

    enjoyable

    อาจเป็นได้

    น่าสนุก

    -ful

    beautiful

    skillful

    สวย

    ชำนาญการ

    careful

    faithful

    ระมัดระวัง

    ซื่อสัตย์

    -an

    American

    Russian

    เป็นอเมริกัน

    เป็นรัสเซีย

    human

    German

    เป็นมนุษย์

    เป็นเยอรมัน

    -ing

    amusing

    surprising

    น่าขบขัน

    น่าประหลาดใจ

    willing

    disappointing

    เต็มอกเต็มใจ

    น่าผิดหวัง

    -less

    careless

    harmless

    ประมาท

    ไม่มีอันตราย

    childless

    senseless

    ไม่มีบุตร

    สมองทึบ

    -ar

    popular

    familiar

    เป็นที่นิยมรักใคร่

    คุ้นเคย

    regular

    particular

    สม่ำเสมอ

    โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่ง

    -like

    childlike

    ladylike

    เหมือนเด็ก

    อย่างสุภาพสตรี

    womanlike

    flowerlike

    เหมือนผู้หญิง

    เหมือนดอกไม้

    -ish

    childish

    sheepish

    ราวกับเด็ก

    ขี้อาย

    foolish

    snobbish

    โง่

    วางโอ่ยะโส

    (2) คำคุณศัพท์บางคำไม่เป็นไปตามหลักเกณฑ์ในข้อ (1) โดยมากมักเป็นคำพยางค์เดียว ได้แก่
    large      ใหญ่
    small  เล็ก
    old  ชรา
    young  หนุ่มสาว
    old    เก่า
    new    ใหม่
    long    ยาว
    short    สั้น
    hard    แข็ง
    soft    อ่อน
    rich    รวย
    poor    จน
    hot    ร้อน
    cold    หนาว
    black  สีดำ
    white  สีขาว
    good  ดี
    bad    เลว
    (3) คำนามที่เติมส่วนประกอบท้ายคำด้วย -ly ถือว่าเป็นคำคุณศัพท์ ได้แก่
    นาม               คุณศัพท์
    brother        brotherly    เป็นพี่น้อง
    court             courtly    ประจบประแจงเอาใจ
    earth             earthly    แห่งโลก
    coward         cowardly    อย่างขลาดเขลา
    father            fatherly    อย่างบิดา
    friend            friendly    อย่างมิตร
    heaven         heavenly    จากฟากฟ้า, จากสวรรค์
    king               kingly    อย่างราชา
    man              manly    อย่างลูกผู้ชาย
    master         masterly    อย่างหลักแหลม
    mother        motherly    อย่างมารดา
    neighbor     neighborly    อย่างเพื่อนบ้าน
    saint             saintly    ใจเมตตาแบบนักบุญ
    scholar        scholarly    อย่างรอบรู้
    woman        womanly    เหมือนผู้หญิง
    world           worldly    แห่งโลก
    knight          knightly    แบบขุนนางหรืออัศวิน
    leisure         leisurely    อย่างสบายๆ
    prince         princely    ราวกับเจ้านาย
    queen         queenly    ราวกับราชินี
    (4) คำต่อไปนี้ทำหน้าที่ได้ทั้งคำคุณศัพท์และคำวิเศษณ์ ได้แก่
    fast เร็ว (adj.) อย่างเร็ว (adv.)
    half ครึ่ง (adj., adv.)
    hard ยาก, แข็ง, หนัก, ขยัน (adj.) อย่างหนัก (adv.)
    late สาย (adj, adv.)
    straight ตรง (adj., adv.)
    ตัวอย่าง
    (คำเน้นตัวหน้าเป็น adjective ส่วนตัวหลังเป็น adverb)
    The plane made a fast trip because it went fast.
    เครื่องบินเดินทางได้เร็วเพราะมันบินอย่างเร็ว
    You get only half credit for a half-finished test.
    คุณได้คะแนนเพียงครึ่งหนึ่งสำหรับการสอบที่สำเร็จเพียงครึ่งเดียว
    A hard worker works hard.
    คนงานที่ขยันทำงานอย่างหนัก
    A late student arrives late.
    นักเรียนที่มาเรียนสายก็มาถึงสาย
    A straight path goes straight to its end.
    เส้นทางตรงพุ่งตรงไปยังปลายทาง
    หมายเหตุ คำว่า hardly และ lately เป็นคำวิเศษณ์ มีความหมายต่างไปจาก hard และ late ที่ยกมาข้างต้น กล่าวคือ hardly = แทบจะไม่, lately = เมื่อเร็วๆ นี้
    ตัวอย่าง
    If you study hard, you will learn.
    But if you hardly study, you will not learn.
    ถ้าคุณขยันเรียน คุณก็จะเรียนรู้
    แต่ถ้าคุณไม่ยอมเรียน คุณก็จะไม่เรียนรู้
    Laura often comes to class late.
    She has moved here lately.
    ลอร่ามาเข้าชั้นเรียนสาย
    หล่อนได้ย้ายมาอยู่ที่นี่เมื่อเร็วๆ นี้
    (5) คำว่า near เป็นได้ทั้งคำคุณศัพท์ และคำวิเศษณ์ และยังเป็นคำบุพบทด้วย แปลว่า “ใกล้” ส่วน nearly เป็นคำวิเศษณ์ แปลว่า “เกือบจะ” (almost)
    ตัวอย่าง
    John is a near neighbor of mine. He lives near me.
    จอห์นเป็นเพื่อนบ้านข้างเคียงของผม เขาพักอาศัยอยู่ใกล้ผม
    Mr.Brown nearly died of pneumonia.
    นายบราวน์เกือบจะตายด้วยโรคปอดบวม
    ที่มา:รองศาสตราจารย์ทณุ  เตียวรัตนกุล

    (Visited 53,980 times, 1 visits today)


    Adjectives


    In this video, students learn all about adjectives. Students watch an explanation and examples using the two common sentence patterns for adjectives in English. For more videos and lessons, visit us at https://esllibrary.com.
    Link to lesson: https://esllibrary.com/courses/88/lessons/2093
    Subscribe to ESL Library’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/Esllibrary
    Follow us for more great content!
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/esllibrary/
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ESLlibrary/
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/esllibrary/
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ESLlibrary/
    Pinterest: https://ar.pinterest.com/esllibrary/

    นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูเพิ่มเติม

    Adjectives

    Adjectives 100 คำที่ใช้บ่อยที่สุด


    เรียนคอร์สออนไลน์: http://www.learningtreeuk.com
    ติดตามทางเฟสบุ๊ค: http://www.facebook.com/learninguk
    ติดต่อสอบถาม: https://line.me/R/ti/p/%40ttw7272u
    และไลน์ของครูพิม pimolwan1984

    Adjectives 100 คำที่ใช้บ่อยที่สุด

    \”Wide Open World of Adjectives\” by The Bazillions


    Make your writing interesting! Discover the wide open world of adjectives with the Bazillions! Find out more at http://www.thebazillions.com
    Wide open world of adjectives
    by The Bazillions
    ©2017 All rights reserved.
    My book report was too short
    It needed something more
    So it was handed back to me by Mrs. B
    She asked me to explore
    The wide open world of adjectives
    They are the words
    I might have missed
    That modify and describe
    People, places and things
    Making life interesting
    There was a boy, a little boy
    A redheaded, little boy
    And the boy had a dog, a big dog
    A big friendly, shaggy dog
    Chorus
    They took a walk, a lazy, long walk
    And saw a bird, a tiny, yellow bird
    They sailed a boat, an old wooden boat
    On a lake, a clear, blue lake
    Beneath the sun, The warm morning sun
    They caught a fish, more like eight shiny fish
    It was a day, an unforgettable day
    And they went home, home sweet home
    To the world of adjectives
    They are the words I’ll never miss
    That modify and describe
    People, places and things
    Making life interesting
    Makes your writing interesting
    Making life interesting
    Get \”Wide Open World of Adjectives\” and the new album \”RockNRoll Yearbook\” on iTunes! https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/rocknrollyearbook/id1263204971
    Subscribe to our channel! http://bit.ly/1whOfqH
    Like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/thebazillions

    \

    Adjectives and Adverbs | Parts of Speech | English Lessons


    Learn about adjectives and adverbs and understand the difference between these two parts of speech.
    Video Lesson:
    Nouns, Verbs \u0026 Adjectives: https://youtu.be/q377kuCSXiA
    Visit https://easyteaching.net for resources, videos, worksheets, games and lots more.

    Adjectives and Adverbs | Parts of Speech | English Lessons

    ADJECTIVES: OPPOSITES | English Vocabulary | Adjectives Quiz # 1


    An adjective modifies a noun or a pronoun.
    To modify means “to describe’” or “to make the meaning of a word more specific.”
    An adjective is a modifier that tells what kind, which one, how many, or how much.
    In this video, you will learn adjectives and their opposites. So, without further ado, Let’s Get Grammarous!🙌
    LIKE. SUBSCRIBE. SHARE. ❤
    RELATED VIDEOS:
    ADJECTIVES | Articles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yyCrgn1EnI\u0026list=PLgOaW_1JXbdpx20fwt6GIbJxqAAS8gPe\u0026index=20
    Pronoun or Adjective? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HevmFpJLSR0\u0026list=PLgOaW_1JXbdpx20fwt6GIbJxqAAS8gPe\u0026index=21
    Noun or Adjective? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVKxeW3U82Y\u0026list=PLgOaW_1JXbdpx20fwt6GIbJxqAAS8gPe\u0026index=22
    PROPER ADJECTIVES https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpFgxmR3eJk\u0026list=PLgOaW_1JXbdpx20fwt6GIbJxqAAS8gPe\u0026index=23

    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for \”fair use\” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

    adjectives whatareadjectives partsofspeech english education sentences teaching writing edtech education classroom elearning edapp teaching globaled ntchat mlearning engchat esl jobs english teacher china teachers cup team eslone map time today students tefl tesol blocks ell efl ielts esl gramteachers teach teachingresources backtoschool

    ADJECTIVES: OPPOSITES | English Vocabulary | Adjectives Quiz # 1

    นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูบทความเพิ่มเติมในหมวดหมู่MAKE MONEY ONLINE

    ขอบคุณที่รับชมกระทู้ครับ คำ adjectives

    See also  [NEW] เทคนิคตั้งชื่อในเกมให้เด่น และชื่อเท่ ๆ 1000+ ชื่อที่สามารถใช้ได้ | ชื่ออังกฤษเพราะๆ - NATAVIGUIDES
    See also  เปิดวงจรทุนจีนสวมบัตรตั้งบริษัททัวร์ฮุบเกาะภูเก็ต | เปิดบริษัททัวร์ | Nataviguides

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.