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[Update] The best UK universities 2021 – rankings | great britain คือ – NATAVIGUIDES

great britain คือ: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

1
3
Oxford
100
n/a
n/a
n/a
10.3
10
203
7.1
93
99

Satisfied with course

n/a

Satisfied with teaching

n/a

Satisfied with feedback

n/a

Student to staff ratio

10.3

Spend per student/10

10

Average entry tariff

203

Value added score/10

7.1

Career after 15 months

93

Contin-uation

99

2
2
St Andrews
98
94
93
80.8
11.2
7
211
6.3
84
97

Satisfied with course

94

Satisfied with teaching

93

Satisfied with feedback

80.8

Student to staff ratio

11.2

Spend per student/10

7

Average entry tariff

211

Value added score/10

6.3

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

97

3
1
Cambridge
95.4
n/a
n/a
n/a
11.2
9.9
212
5.4
93
99

Satisfied with course

n/a

Satisfied with teaching

n/a

Satisfied with feedback

n/a

Student to staff ratio

11.2

Spend per student/10

9.9

Average entry tariff

212

Value added score/10

5.4

Career after 15 months

93

Contin-uation

99

4
5
Durham
81.5
86.1
85.3
71.8
14.7
5.9
188
7
89
98

Satisfied with course

86.1

Satisfied with teaching

85.3

Satisfied with feedback

71.8

Student to staff ratio

14.7

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

188

Value added score/10

7

Career after 15 months

89

Contin-uation

98

5
19
London School of Economics
81
80.6
81.6
69.4
11.9
8.9
170
6.9
93
97

Satisfied with course

80.6

Satisfied with teaching

81.6

Satisfied with feedback

69.4

Student to staff ratio

11.9

Spend per student/10

8.9

Average entry tariff

170

Value added score/10

6.9

Career after 15 months

93

Contin-uation

97

6
6
Bath
80.1
87.7
86.3
67
14.9
6.3
174
7.1
91
97

Satisfied with course

87.7

Satisfied with teaching

86.3

Satisfied with feedback

67

Student to staff ratio

14.9

Spend per student/10

6.3

Average entry tariff

174

Value added score/10

7.1

Career after 15 months

91

Contin-uation

97

7
4
Loughborough
79.3
89.6
86.9
73.9
13.4
5.7
153
6.3
85
96

Satisfied with course

89.6

Satisfied with teaching

86.9

Satisfied with feedback

73.9

Student to staff ratio

13.4

Spend per student/10

5.7

Average entry tariff

153

Value added score/10

6.3

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

96

8
9
Warwick
77.1
86.2
85
71.6
13.8
7.3
172
6.3
88
96

Satisfied with course

86.2

Satisfied with teaching

85

Satisfied with feedback

71.6

Student to staff ratio

13.8

Spend per student/10

7.3

Average entry tariff

172

Value added score/10

6.3

Career after 15 months

88

Contin-uation

96

9
7
Imperial College
74.4
81.6
83.6
60.7
11.1
8.8
190
5.6
96
95

Satisfied with course

81.6

Satisfied with teaching

83.6

Satisfied with feedback

60.7

Student to staff ratio

11.1

Spend per student/10

8.8

Average entry tariff

190

Value added score/10

5.6

Career after 15 months

96

Contin-uation

95

10
7
Lancaster
73.1
86.9
85
70.1
12.5
8.1
150
5.2
84
96

Satisfied with course

86.9

Satisfied with teaching

85

Satisfied with feedback

70.1

Student to staff ratio

12.5

Spend per student/10

8.1

Average entry tariff

150

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

96

11
23
Bristol
72
83.5
85.7
67.3
13.3
6.8
169
6.5
86
97

Satisfied with course

83.5

Satisfied with teaching

85.7

Satisfied with feedback

67.3

Student to staff ratio

13.3

Spend per student/10

6.8

Average entry tariff

169

Value added score/10

6.5

Career after 15 months

86

Contin-uation

97

12
14
Glasgow
71
86.4
86.7
66.7
13.4
5.9
204
5.4
85
94

Satisfied with course

86.4

Satisfied with teaching

86.7

Satisfied with feedback

66.7

Student to staff ratio

13.4

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

204

Value added score/10

5.4

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

94

13
25
Edinburgh
70.9
77.9
82.9
60.1
11.9
8.6
187
6.7
84
97

Satisfied with course

77.9

Satisfied with teaching

82.9

Satisfied with feedback

60.1

Student to staff ratio

11.9

Spend per student/10

8.6

Average entry tariff

187

Value added score/10

6.7

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

97

14
22
UCL
70.1
81.2
82
64.7
10.4
7.4
175
6.2
89
96

Satisfied with course

81.2

Satisfied with teaching

82

Satisfied with feedback

64.7

Student to staff ratio

10.4

Spend per student/10

7.4

Average entry tariff

175

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

89

Contin-uation

96

15
51
Strathclyde
70
86.3
86
66.5
19.5
6.4
197
6.1
86
93

Satisfied with course

86.3

Satisfied with teaching

86

Satisfied with feedback

66.5

Student to staff ratio

19.5

Spend per student/10

6.4

Average entry tariff

197

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

86

Contin-uation

93

16
10
Exeter
69.9
86.6
85.7
70.6
15.6
3.7
164
6.1
85
97

Satisfied with course

86.6

Satisfied with teaching

85.7

Satisfied with feedback

70.6

Student to staff ratio

15.6

Spend per student/10

3.7

Average entry tariff

164

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

97

16
20
York
69.9
87.1
87.1
73.9
14.4
4.8
151
5
84
96

Satisfied with course

87.1

Satisfied with teaching

87.1

Satisfied with feedback

73.9

Student to staff ratio

14.4

Spend per student/10

4.8

Average entry tariff

151

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

96

18
11
Leeds
69.7
84.1
85.3
69.5
13.7
6.7
162
6.8
85
95

Satisfied with course

84.1

Satisfied with teaching

85.3

Satisfied with feedback

69.5

Student to staff ratio

13.7

Spend per student/10

6.7

Average entry tariff

162

Value added score/10

6.8

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

95

19
29
Dundee
68.4
88.9
87.5
72.2
14.3
5.9
175
4.9
88
94

Satisfied with course

88.9

Satisfied with teaching

87.5

Satisfied with feedback

72.2

Student to staff ratio

14.3

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

175

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

88

Contin-uation

94

20
34
Aberdeen
68.1
87.1
86.1
69.5
16.2
4.4
183
6.6
82
95

Satisfied with course

87.1

Satisfied with teaching

86.1

Satisfied with feedback

69.5

Student to staff ratio

16.2

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

183

Value added score/10

6.6

Career after 15 months

82

Contin-uation

95

21
16
Birmingham
67.3
84.2
85
66.7
14.1
6.8
159
6.3
87
97

Satisfied with course

84.2

Satisfied with teaching

85

Satisfied with feedback

66.7

Student to staff ratio

14.1

Spend per student/10

6.8

Average entry tariff

159

Value added score/10

6.3

Career after 15 months

87

Contin-uation

97

21
28
UWE Bristol
67.3
88.5
87.3
76.6
15.4
4.9
121
6.2
80
91

Satisfied with course

88.5

Satisfied with teaching

87.3

Satisfied with feedback

76.6

Student to staff ratio

15.4

Spend per student/10

4.9

Average entry tariff

121

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

91

23
24
Southampton
67.1
84.8
84.8
71
13.3
5.9
153
7
84
94

Satisfied with course

84.8

Satisfied with teaching

84.8

Satisfied with feedback

71

Student to staff ratio

13.3

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

153

Value added score/10

7

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

94

24
31
Swansea
66.9
88.8
85.6
73.2
15
6.2
128
5.8
84
94

Satisfied with course

88.8

Satisfied with teaching

85.6

Satisfied with feedback

73.2

Student to staff ratio

15

Spend per student/10

6.2

Average entry tariff

128

Value added score/10

5.8

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

94

25
40
Manchester
66.6
82.4
82.8
67.9
13.1
8.3
165
5.7
85
96

Satisfied with course

82.4

Satisfied with teaching

82.8

Satisfied with feedback

67.9

Student to staff ratio

13.1

Spend per student/10

8.3

Average entry tariff

165

Value added score/10

5.7

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

96

26
15
Coventry
66.3
83.2
85.9
73.5
13.9
6.6
122
6.9
82
91

Satisfied with course

83.2

Satisfied with teaching

85.9

Satisfied with feedback

73.5

Student to staff ratio

13.9

Spend per student/10

6.6

Average entry tariff

122

Value added score/10

6.9

Career after 15 months

82

Contin-uation

91

27
47
Northumbria
65.7
82.4
82.3
74.2
15.5
3.6
143
7.3
78
92

Satisfied with course

82.4

Satisfied with teaching

82.3

Satisfied with feedback

74.2

Student to staff ratio

15.5

Spend per student/10

3.6

Average entry tariff

143

Value added score/10

7.3

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

92

28
45
Stirling
65.6
84.5
85.3
75.5
16.2
3.8
165
4.9
81
91

Satisfied with course

84.5

Satisfied with teaching

85.3

Satisfied with feedback

75.5

Student to staff ratio

16.2

Spend per student/10

3.8

Average entry tariff

165

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

91

29
73
Chichester
65.2
84.7
87.4
76.4
14.4
4.1
123
5.5
74
94

Satisfied with course

84.7

Satisfied with teaching

87.4

Satisfied with feedback

76.4

Student to staff ratio

14.4

Spend per student/10

4.1

Average entry tariff

123

Value added score/10

5.5

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

94

30
36
Aston
64.7
84
83.5
70
16.1
5.9
128
6.4
83
96

Satisfied with course

84

Satisfied with teaching

83.5

Satisfied with feedback

70

Student to staff ratio

16.1

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

128

Value added score/10

6.4

Career after 15 months

83

Contin-uation

96

31
45
Sheffield
64.2
86.5
85.7
70.8
14.7
5.3
152
5.7
84
96

Satisfied with course

86.5

Satisfied with teaching

85.7

Satisfied with feedback

70.8

Student to staff ratio

14.7

Spend per student/10

5.3

Average entry tariff

152

Value added score/10

5.7

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

96

32
42
Royal Holloway
63.9
87.7
86.3
72.1
14.7
5.5
134
4.9
79
95

Satisfied with course

87.7

Satisfied with teaching

86.3

Satisfied with feedback

72.1

Student to staff ratio

14.7

Spend per student/10

5.5

Average entry tariff

134

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

79

Contin-uation

95

33
13
University for the Creative Arts
63.8
81.6
83.8
79
13.7
7.7
136
5
63
90

Satisfied with course

81.6

Satisfied with teaching

83.8

Satisfied with feedback

79

Student to staff ratio

13.7

Spend per student/10

7.7

Average entry tariff

136

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

63

Contin-uation

90

34
57
West London
63.6
87.3
88.6
79.5
15.2
6
122
6.2
72
88

Satisfied with course

87.3

Satisfied with teaching

88.6

Satisfied with feedback

79.5

Student to staff ratio

15.2

Spend per student/10

6

Average entry tariff

122

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

72

Contin-uation

88

35
32
Keele
63.2
87.2
86.3
73.4
14.3
4.4
123
5.7
81
95

Satisfied with course

87.2

Satisfied with teaching

86.3

Satisfied with feedback

73.4

Student to staff ratio

14.3

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

123

Value added score/10

5.7

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

95

35
61
Heriot-Watt
63.2
85
83.3
66.8
17.8
8.1
168
6.2
83
92

Satisfied with course

85

Satisfied with teaching

83.3

Satisfied with feedback

66.8

Student to staff ratio

17.8

Spend per student/10

8.1

Average entry tariff

168

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

83

Contin-uation

92

37
38
Cardiff
63.1
83.1
83.1
68.7
14.3
7.1
154
5.2
85
95

Satisfied with course

83.1

Satisfied with teaching

83.1

Satisfied with feedback

68.7

Student to staff ratio

14.3

Spend per student/10

7.1

Average entry tariff

154

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

85

Contin-uation

95

38
18
Nottingham
63
83.2
84.1
67.2
14.5
6.6
150
6
87
96

Satisfied with course

83.2

Satisfied with teaching

84.1

Satisfied with feedback

67.2

Student to staff ratio

14.5

Spend per student/10

6.6

Average entry tariff

150

Value added score/10

6

Career after 15 months

87

Contin-uation

96

38
30
UEA
63
85.7
85.1
70.7
13.5
4.2
139
6.1
82
93

Satisfied with course

85.7

Satisfied with teaching

85.1

Satisfied with feedback

70.7

Student to staff ratio

13.5

Spend per student/10

4.2

Average entry tariff

139

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

82

Contin-uation

93

40
48
Kingston
62.8
81.6
81.9
73.5
16.8
6.5
117
6.9
75
92

Satisfied with course

81.6

Satisfied with teaching

81.9

Satisfied with feedback

73.5

Student to staff ratio

16.8

Spend per student/10

6.5

Average entry tariff

117

Value added score/10

6.9

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

92

41
12
Nottingham Trent
62.7
87.2
84.4
78.7
14.8
4.9
125
3.6
75
92

Satisfied with course

87.2

Satisfied with teaching

84.4

Satisfied with feedback

78.7

Student to staff ratio

14.8

Spend per student/10

4.9

Average entry tariff

125

Value added score/10

3.6

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

92

42
63
King’s College London
62.5
78.9
81.9
62.8
11.9
6.8
164
6.2
90
95

Satisfied with course

78.9

Satisfied with teaching

81.9

Satisfied with feedback

62.8

Student to staff ratio

11.9

Spend per student/10

6.8

Average entry tariff

164

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

90

Contin-uation

95

43
33
Oxford Brookes
62.3
81.7
80.8
68.8
14.7
5.7
122
6.9
81
95

Satisfied with course

81.7

Satisfied with teaching

80.8

Satisfied with feedback

68.8

Student to staff ratio

14.7

Spend per student/10

5.7

Average entry tariff

122

Value added score/10

6.9

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

95

43
76
Robert Gordon
62.3
89.3
86.9
76.8
18.7
3.3
156
4.9
81
92

Satisfied with course

89.3

Satisfied with teaching

86.9

Satisfied with feedback

76.8

Student to staff ratio

18.7

Spend per student/10

3.3

Average entry tariff

156

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

92

45
39
University of the Arts London
61.9
70.9
76.1
75.1
13.7
10
136
6.2
65
91

Satisfied with course

70.9

Satisfied with teaching

76.1

Satisfied with feedback

75.1

Student to staff ratio

13.7

Spend per student/10

10

Average entry tariff

136

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

65

Contin-uation

91

46
53
Queen’s, Belfast
61.6
82.1
84
66.4
14.6
5.3
152
7
87
95

Satisfied with course

82.1

Satisfied with teaching

84

Satisfied with feedback

66.4

Student to staff ratio

14.6

Spend per student/10

5.3

Average entry tariff

152

Value added score/10

7

Career after 15 months

87

Contin-uation

95

47
55
Sheffield Hallam
61.3
84.6
85.9
74.7
16.8
5.6
116
6.1
80
92

Satisfied with course

84.6

Satisfied with teaching

85.9

Satisfied with feedback

74.7

Student to staff ratio

16.8

Spend per student/10

5.6

Average entry tariff

116

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

92

48
87
Abertay Dundee
61.2
88.1
88.7
80.8
21.2
2.1
142
7
71
89

Satisfied with course

88.1

Satisfied with teaching

88.7

Satisfied with feedback

80.8

Student to staff ratio

21.2

Spend per student/10

2.1

Average entry tariff

142

Value added score/10

7

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

89

49
54
Aberystwyth
61.1
90.6
90.4
84.3
16.8
4.8
123
4.8
71
92

Satisfied with course

90.6

Satisfied with teaching

90.4

Satisfied with feedback

84.3

Student to staff ratio

16.8

Spend per student/10

4.8

Average entry tariff

123

Value added score/10

4.8

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

92

50
86
Bolton
61
83.6
88.1
78.9
14.4
6.8
114
2.8
69
87

Satisfied with course

83.6

Satisfied with teaching

88.1

Satisfied with feedback

78.9

Student to staff ratio

14.4

Spend per student/10

6.8

Average entry tariff

114

Value added score/10

2.8

Career after 15 months

69

Contin-uation

87

51
35
Newcastle
60.8
83.7
83.5
65.6
14.2
6
150
5.1
84
96

Satisfied with course

83.7

Satisfied with teaching

83.5

Satisfied with feedback

65.6

Student to staff ratio

14.2

Spend per student/10

6

Average entry tariff

150

Value added score/10

5.1

Career after 15 months

84

Contin-uation

96

52
17
Lincoln
60.7
86.5
85.1
71.8
15.3
3.8
120
5
77
95

Satisfied with course

86.5

Satisfied with teaching

85.1

Satisfied with feedback

71.8

Student to staff ratio

15.3

Spend per student/10

3.8

Average entry tariff

120

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

77

Contin-uation

95

53
60
Plymouth
60.6
85
86.3
76
16.2
5.1
127
5.6
80
93

Satisfied with course

85

Satisfied with teaching

86.3

Satisfied with feedback

76

Student to staff ratio

16.2

Spend per student/10

5.1

Average entry tariff

127

Value added score/10

5.6

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

93

54
26
Surrey
60.4
81.1
81.5
64.3
15.8
5.6
147
5.4
87
95

Satisfied with course

81.1

Satisfied with teaching

81.5

Satisfied with feedback

64.3

Student to staff ratio

15.8

Spend per student/10

5.6

Average entry tariff

147

Value added score/10

5.4

Career after 15 months

87

Contin-uation

95

55
37
Staffordshire
60.3
84.2
86.6
79.4
17.5
5.9
120
4.7
71
89

Satisfied with course

84.2

Satisfied with teaching

86.6

Satisfied with feedback

79.4

Student to staff ratio

17.5

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

120

Value added score/10

4.7

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

89

56
57
Trinity Saint David
59.4
83.6
86.5
80.8
16.3
5.3
118
5.8
62
86

Satisfied with course

83.6

Satisfied with teaching

86.5

Satisfied with feedback

80.8

Student to staff ratio

16.3

Spend per student/10

5.3

Average entry tariff

118

Value added score/10

5.8

Career after 15 months

62

Contin-uation

86

56
26
Derby
59.4
84
86.6
76.6
14.6
6.1
117
4.1
72
90

Satisfied with course

84

Satisfied with teaching

86.6

Satisfied with feedback

76.6

Student to staff ratio

14.6

Spend per student/10

6.1

Average entry tariff

117

Value added score/10

4.1

Career after 15 months

72

Contin-uation

90

56
73
Bournemouth
59.4
79.5
81.8
70.8
17.6
4.2
115
6.7
81
93

Satisfied with course

79.5

Satisfied with teaching

81.8

Satisfied with feedback

70.8

Student to staff ratio

17.6

Spend per student/10

4.2

Average entry tariff

115

Value added score/10

6.7

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

93

59
41
Sussex
59.3
82.8
82.5
67.1
17.4
6.5
142
4.6
80
95

Satisfied with course

82.8

Satisfied with teaching

82.5

Satisfied with feedback

67.1

Student to staff ratio

17.4

Spend per student/10

6.5

Average entry tariff

142

Value added score/10

4.6

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

95

59
50
Liverpool
59.3
84.9
84.5
72.1
14.4
7.4
143
5.4
83
96

Satisfied with course

84.9

Satisfied with teaching

84.5

Satisfied with feedback

72.1

Student to staff ratio

14.4

Spend per student/10

7.4

Average entry tariff

143

Value added score/10

5.4

Career after 15 months

83

Contin-uation

96

61
59
Ulster
59
84.4
83.3
73.3
18.1
4
129
6.5
79
91

Satisfied with course

84.4

Satisfied with teaching

83.3

Satisfied with feedback

73.3

Student to staff ratio

18.1

Spend per student/10

4

Average entry tariff

129

Value added score/10

6.5

Career after 15 months

79

Contin-uation

91

62
68
Reading
58.9
83.6
83.1
68.7
15.8
5
127
6.3
81
95

Satisfied with course

83.6

Satisfied with teaching

83.1

Satisfied with feedback

68.7

Student to staff ratio

15.8

Spend per student/10

5

Average entry tariff

127

Value added score/10

6.3

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

95

62
105
Edinburgh Napier
58.9
82.5
82.7
72.3
18.2
4.4
152
7.3
78
90

Satisfied with course

82.5

Satisfied with teaching

82.7

Satisfied with feedback

72.3

Student to staff ratio

18.2

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

152

Value added score/10

7.3

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

90

See also  [Update] | เรียน ฝรั่งเศส ฟรี - NATAVIGUIDES

64
43
Huddersfield
58.5
80.5
81.5
75.1
15.5
4.4
128
6.1
75
91

Satisfied with course

80.5

Satisfied with teaching

81.5

Satisfied with feedback

75.1

Student to staff ratio

15.5

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

128

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

91

65
84
Queen Margaret
58.4
82.2
84.9
73.5
19.5
2.2
144
6.4
74
90

Satisfied with course

82.2

Satisfied with teaching

84.9

Satisfied with feedback

73.5

Student to staff ratio

19.5

Spend per student/10

2.2

Average entry tariff

144

Value added score/10

6.4

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

90

66
21
Portsmouth
58.3
86
84.4
73.9
16.1
5.9
113
5.5
76
92

Satisfied with course

86

Satisfied with teaching

84.4

Satisfied with feedback

73.9

Student to staff ratio

16.1

Spend per student/10

5.9

Average entry tariff

113

Value added score/10

5.5

Career after 15 months

76

Contin-uation

92

66
98
South Wales
58.3
82.5
84.5
76.9
14.4
4.6
120
4.9
73
91

Satisfied with course

82.5

Satisfied with teaching

84.5

Satisfied with feedback

76.9

Student to staff ratio

14.4

Spend per student/10

4.6

Average entry tariff

120

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

73

Contin-uation

91

68
70
Teesside
58.2
82.6
85.6
78.1
18.2
5.2
118
6.1
82
89

Satisfied with course

82.6

Satisfied with teaching

85.6

Satisfied with feedback

78.1

Student to staff ratio

18.2

Spend per student/10

5.2

Average entry tariff

118

Value added score/10

6.1

Career after 15 months

82

Contin-uation

89

68
83
Queen Mary
58.2
80.5
80.7
63.2
13
4.9
152
6.4
83
93

Satisfied with course

80.5

Satisfied with teaching

80.7

Satisfied with feedback

63.2

Student to staff ratio

13

Spend per student/10

4.9

Average entry tariff

152

Value added score/10

6.4

Career after 15 months

83

Contin-uation

93

70
79
Manchester Met
57.2
83.8
82.8
75
15
4.7
131
4.1
71
92

Satisfied with course

83.8

Satisfied with teaching

82.8

Satisfied with feedback

75

Student to staff ratio

15

Spend per student/10

4.7

Average entry tariff

131

Value added score/10

4.1

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

92

70
63
Liverpool John Moores
57.2
84
82.6
74
16.8
3.9
145
4.7
73
91

Satisfied with course

84

Satisfied with teaching

82.6

Satisfied with feedback

74

Student to staff ratio

16.8

Spend per student/10

3.9

Average entry tariff

145

Value added score/10

4.7

Career after 15 months

73

Contin-uation

91

72
113
Cardiff Met
57.1
84.4
83.3
73.7
18.1
4.4
128
5.5
78
89

Satisfied with course

84.4

Satisfied with teaching

83.3

Satisfied with feedback

73.7

Student to staff ratio

18.1

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

128

Value added score/10

5.5

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

89

72
95
Hull
57.1
83.5
84.7
74.3
15.1
5.2
125
5.3
78
91

Satisfied with course

83.5

Satisfied with teaching

84.7

Satisfied with feedback

74.3

Student to staff ratio

15.1

Spend per student/10

5.2

Average entry tariff

125

Value added score/10

5.3

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

91

74
73
Solent
57
83
84.5
76.2
15.8
3.4
121
4.9
70
90

Satisfied with course

83

Satisfied with teaching

84.5

Satisfied with feedback

76.2

Student to staff ratio

15.8

Spend per student/10

3.4

Average entry tariff

121

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

70

Contin-uation

90

75
48
Edge Hill
56.8
79.7
81.6
73.7
14
3.5
130
4.6
75
92

Satisfied with course

79.7

Satisfied with teaching

81.6

Satisfied with feedback

73.7

Student to staff ratio

14

Spend per student/10

3.5

Average entry tariff

130

Value added score/10

4.6

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

92

75
78
Bangor
56.8
86.6
85.5
77.3
15.7
3.1
123
4.1
77
92

Satisfied with course

86.6

Satisfied with teaching

85.5

Satisfied with feedback

77.3

Student to staff ratio

15.7

Spend per student/10

3.1

Average entry tariff

123

Value added score/10

4.1

Career after 15 months

77

Contin-uation

92

77
80
Glasgow Caledonian
56.6
83.7
84.3
72.9
21.4
2.6
158
7.3
77
91

Satisfied with course

83.7

Satisfied with teaching

84.3

Satisfied with feedback

72.9

Student to staff ratio

21.4

Spend per student/10

2.6

Average entry tariff

158

Value added score/10

7.3

Career after 15 months

77

Contin-uation

91

77
84
Leicester
56.6
83.3
82.5
68.2
13.7
6.1
132
5.2
81
95

Satisfied with course

83.3

Satisfied with teaching

82.5

Satisfied with feedback

68.2

Student to staff ratio

13.7

Spend per student/10

6.1

Average entry tariff

132

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

95

79
72
Central Lancashire
56.5
79.9
81.8
75
13.3
5.5
127
5.3
76
90

Satisfied with course

79.9

Satisfied with teaching

81.8

Satisfied with feedback

75

Student to staff ratio

13.3

Spend per student/10

5.5

Average entry tariff

127

Value added score/10

5.3

Career after 15 months

76

Contin-uation

90

80
99
Anglia Ruskin
56.4
82.6
85.1
76.1
17.7
6.3
110
6.6
77
88

Satisfied with course

82.6

Satisfied with teaching

85.1

Satisfied with feedback

76.1

Student to staff ratio

17.7

Spend per student/10

6.3

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

6.6

Career after 15 months

77

Contin-uation

88

81
82
Chester
56.3
85.7
84.8
76.8
15.1
4.5
115
5.2
72
90

Satisfied with course

85.7

Satisfied with teaching

84.8

Satisfied with feedback

76.8

Student to staff ratio

15.1

Spend per student/10

4.5

Average entry tariff

115

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

72

Contin-uation

90

82
65
Kent
56.2
84
83.6
69.1
17
4.5
131
5
76
95

Satisfied with course

84

Satisfied with teaching

83.6

Satisfied with feedback

69.1

Student to staff ratio

17

Spend per student/10

4.5

Average entry tariff

131

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

76

Contin-uation

95

83
81
Birmingham City
56
81.4
83.3
75.5
16.6
6.4
123
5.4
75
90

Satisfied with course

81.4

Satisfied with teaching

83.3

Satisfied with feedback

75.5

Student to staff ratio

16.6

Spend per student/10

6.4

Average entry tariff

123

Value added score/10

5.4

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

90

84
43
Liverpool Hope
55.5
84.1
84.9
78.4
15
2
114
4.5
67
89

Satisfied with course

84.1

Satisfied with teaching

84.9

Satisfied with feedback

78.4

Student to staff ratio

15

Spend per student/10

2

Average entry tariff

114

Value added score/10

4.5

Career after 15 months

67

Contin-uation

89

85
66
Essex
55.1
84.7
83.5
71.3
16.7
6.6
107
5.6
78
91

Satisfied with course

84.7

Satisfied with teaching

83.5

Satisfied with feedback

71.3

Student to staff ratio

16.7

Spend per student/10

6.6

Average entry tariff

107

Value added score/10

5.6

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

91

86
56
SOAS
54.5
78.4
83.2
67.5
11.6
8.9
158
4.9
71
87

Satisfied with course

78.4

Satisfied with teaching

83.2

Satisfied with feedback

67.5

Student to staff ratio

11.6

Spend per student/10

8.9

Average entry tariff

158

Value added score/10

4.9

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

87

87
88
Worcester
53.8
87.2
87.7
78.7
17.8
3.9
116
4.7
76
90

Satisfied with course

87.2

Satisfied with teaching

87.7

Satisfied with feedback

78.7

Student to staff ratio

17.8

Spend per student/10

3.9

Average entry tariff

116

Value added score/10

4.7

Career after 15 months

76

Contin-uation

90

88
67
Gloucestershire
53.4
81.9
83.8
74.6
17.7
5
116
5.8
69
90

Satisfied with course

81.9

Satisfied with teaching

83.8

Satisfied with feedback

74.6

Student to staff ratio

17.7

Spend per student/10

5

Average entry tariff

116

Value added score/10

5.8

Career after 15 months

69

Contin-uation

90

88
52
Falmouth
53.4
77.7
81.4
73.9
17.3
3.6
126
5.2
67
91

Satisfied with course

77.7

Satisfied with teaching

81.4

Satisfied with feedback

73.9

Student to staff ratio

17.3

Spend per student/10

3.6

Average entry tariff

126

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

67

Contin-uation

91

90
93
Northampton
53.1
80.3
82.2
73.9
16.2
8.5
100
5.1
74
88

Satisfied with course

80.3

Satisfied with teaching

82.2

Satisfied with feedback

73.9

Student to staff ratio

16.2

Spend per student/10

8.5

Average entry tariff

100

Value added score/10

5.1

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

88

91
107
York St John
52.8
85.6
86.2
80.2
18
3.1
103
4.7
71
93

Satisfied with course

85.6

Satisfied with teaching

86.2

Satisfied with feedback

80.2

Student to staff ratio

18

Spend per student/10

3.1

Average entry tariff

103

Value added score/10

4.7

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

93

92
120
Bucks New University
52.4
75
79.5
71.3
16.5
7.6
110
5.1
74
89

Satisfied with course

75

Satisfied with teaching

79.5

Satisfied with feedback

71.3

Student to staff ratio

16.5

Spend per student/10

7.6

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

5.1

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

89

93
68
London South Bank
52.3
81.6
81.9
72.8
16.3
5.5
103
5.2
75
88

Satisfied with course

81.6

Satisfied with teaching

81.9

Satisfied with feedback

72.8

Student to staff ratio

16.3

Spend per student/10

5.5

Average entry tariff

103

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

88

94
96
Winchester
51.7
82.6
85
74.2
16.5
2.9
110
5
71
92

Satisfied with course

82.6

Satisfied with teaching

85

Satisfied with feedback

74.2

Student to staff ratio

16.5

Spend per student/10

2.9

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

92

95
97
City
51.3
77.2
77.6
66.3
17.3
7.5
136
5.6
81
90

Satisfied with course

77.2

Satisfied with teaching

77.6

Satisfied with feedback

66.3

Student to staff ratio

17.3

Spend per student/10

7.5

Average entry tariff

136

Value added score/10

5.6

Career after 15 months

81

Contin-uation

90

95
90
Greenwich
51.3
80.5
80.7
73.3
17.8
3.7
122
6.2
77
90

Satisfied with course

80.5

Satisfied with teaching

80.7

Satisfied with feedback

73.3

Student to staff ratio

17.8

Spend per student/10

3.7

Average entry tariff

122

Value added score/10

6.2

Career after 15 months

77

Contin-uation

90

97
119
Suffolk
51
79
84
73.5
16.7
5.8
105
5.1
80
86

Satisfied with course

79

Satisfied with teaching

84

Satisfied with feedback

73.5

Student to staff ratio

16.7

Spend per student/10

5.8

Average entry tariff

105

Value added score/10

5.1

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

86

98
116
Cumbria
50.6
79.2
82.4
73.5
15.7
4.5
120
3.9
78
91

Satisfied with course

79.2

Satisfied with teaching

82.4

Satisfied with feedback

73.5

Student to staff ratio

15.7

Spend per student/10

4.5

Average entry tariff

120

Value added score/10

3.9

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

91

99
71
Bradford
50.5
77.1
79.3
67.6
18
3.1
124
6.6
79
91

Satisfied with course

77.1

Satisfied with teaching

79.3

Satisfied with feedback

67.6

Student to staff ratio

18

Spend per student/10

3.1

Average entry tariff

124

Value added score/10

6.6

Career after 15 months

79

Contin-uation

91

100
89
Sunderland
50.2
82.2
83.5
72.6
15.5
6.6
112
4.5
72
88

Satisfied with course

82.2

Satisfied with teaching

83.5

Satisfied with feedback

72.6

Student to staff ratio

15.5

Spend per student/10

6.6

Average entry tariff

112

Value added score/10

4.5

Career after 15 months

72

Contin-uation

88

101
77
St Mary’s, Twickenham
49.8
83.9
85.2
72.4
18
2.6
110
6
74
89

Satisfied with course

83.9

Satisfied with teaching

85.2

Satisfied with feedback

72.4

Student to staff ratio

18

Spend per student/10

2.6

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

6

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

89

102
114
Brighton
49.3
78.2
82.2
70.1
17.5
3.9
114
4.8
80
90

Satisfied with course

78.2

Satisfied with teaching

82.2

Satisfied with feedback

70.1

Student to staff ratio

17.5

Spend per student/10

3.9

Average entry tariff

114

Value added score/10

4.8

Career after 15 months

80

Contin-uation

90

103
91
Salford
49
79.3
80.4
74.7
16.5
3.3
127
4.5
78
89

Satisfied with course

79.3

Satisfied with teaching

80.4

Satisfied with feedback

74.7

Student to staff ratio

16.5

Spend per student/10

3.3

Average entry tariff

127

Value added score/10

4.5

Career after 15 months

78

Contin-uation

89

103
92
Hertfordshire
49
82.8
82.8
71.5
14.8
4.1
107
3.9
75
91

Satisfied with course

82.8

Satisfied with teaching

82.8

Satisfied with feedback

71.5

Student to staff ratio

14.8

Spend per student/10

4.1

Average entry tariff

107

Value added score/10

3.9

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

91

105
99
Goldsmiths
48.7
73.7
79.4
66.4
14.9
4.6
127
5.2
69
88

Satisfied with course

73.7

Satisfied with teaching

79.4

Satisfied with feedback

66.4

Student to staff ratio

14.9

Spend per student/10

4.6

Average entry tariff

127

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

69

Contin-uation

88

106
118
Leeds Beckett
48.2
84.8
84.2
74.6
19.2
4.1
107
5.2
73
86

Satisfied with course

84.8

Satisfied with teaching

84.2

Satisfied with feedback

74.6

Student to staff ratio

19.2

Spend per student/10

4.1

Average entry tariff

107

Value added score/10

5.2

Career after 15 months

73

Contin-uation

86

107
112
Glyndwr
47.1
77.1
84.1
75.2
19.4
2
112
5
73
88

Satisfied with course

77.1

Satisfied with teaching

84.1

Satisfied with feedback

75.2

Student to staff ratio

19.4

Spend per student/10

2

Average entry tariff

112

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

73

Contin-uation

88

108
110
Newman
46.9
86.9
86.9
76.6
17.1
3.7
110
3.7
68
88

Satisfied with course

86.9

Satisfied with teaching

86.9

Satisfied with feedback

76.6

Student to staff ratio

17.1

Spend per student/10

3.7

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

3.7

Career after 15 months

68

Contin-uation

88

109
107
Bath Spa
46.7
77.2
80.1
71.1
17.2
4.2
111
6.5
68
92

Satisfied with course

77.2

Satisfied with teaching

80.1

Satisfied with feedback

71.1

Student to staff ratio

17.2

Spend per student/10

4.2

Average entry tariff

111

Value added score/10

6.5

Career after 15 months

68

Contin-uation

92

110
99
Brunel
46.2
78.7
77.7
64.2
17.7
4.2
119
5
79
93

Satisfied with course

78.7

Satisfied with teaching

77.7

Satisfied with feedback

64.2

Student to staff ratio

17.7

Spend per student/10

4.2

Average entry tariff

119

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

79

Contin-uation

93

111
109
Middlesex
45.3
76.7
77.5
69.9
17
4.8
115
4.5
68
89

Satisfied with course

76.7

Satisfied with teaching

77.5

Satisfied with feedback

69.9

Student to staff ratio

17

Spend per student/10

4.8

Average entry tariff

115

Value added score/10

4.5

Career after 15 months

68

Contin-uation

89

112
115
Wolverhampton
45.2
81.7
84.3
74.6
17.2
5.5
107
4.5
70
86

Satisfied with course

81.7

Satisfied with teaching

84.3

Satisfied with feedback

74.6

Student to staff ratio

17.2

Spend per student/10

5.5

Average entry tariff

107

Value added score/10

4.5

Career after 15 months

70

Contin-uation

86

112
104
East London
45.2
79.2
82
71.9
19.7
2.4
109
6
66
89

Satisfied with course

79.2

Satisfied with teaching

82

Satisfied with feedback

71.9

Student to staff ratio

19.7

Spend per student/10

2.4

Average entry tariff

109

Value added score/10

6

Career after 15 months

66

Contin-uation

89

114
117
Canterbury Christ Church
45.1
79.9
84.1
72.6
15.6
3.4
105
4.2
75
87

Satisfied with course

79.9

Satisfied with teaching

84.1

Satisfied with feedback

72.6

Student to staff ratio

15.6

Spend per student/10

3.4

Average entry tariff

105

Value added score/10

4.2

Career after 15 months

75

Contin-uation

87

115
94
Leeds Trinity
44.6
78
79
73
21
3.6
104
7
71
87

Satisfied with course

78

Satisfied with teaching

79

Satisfied with feedback

73

Student to staff ratio

21

Spend per student/10

3.6

Average entry tariff

104

Value added score/10

7

Career after 15 months

71

Contin-uation

87

116
103
Roehampton
43.2
80
80.7
71.8
14.8
5.8
102
3.5
67
89

Satisfied with course

80

Satisfied with teaching

80.7

Satisfied with feedback

71.8

Student to staff ratio

14.8

Spend per student/10

5.8

Average entry tariff

102

Value added score/10

3.5

Career after 15 months

67

Contin-uation

89

117
102
Westminster
42.3
78.7
79.2
68.5
20.9
4.4
119
3.8
69
92

Satisfied with course

78.7

Satisfied with teaching

79.2

Satisfied with feedback

68.5

Student to staff ratio

20.9

Spend per student/10

4.4

Average entry tariff

119

Value added score/10

3.8

Career after 15 months

69

Contin-uation

92

118
111
London Met
41.5
79.3
82.1
74.5
17.8
6
96
4.3
66
80

Satisfied with course

79.3

Satisfied with teaching

82.1

Satisfied with feedback

74.5

Student to staff ratio

17.8

Spend per student/10

6

Average entry tariff

96

Value added score/10

4.3

Career after 15 months

66

Contin-uation

80

119
61
De Montfort
40.6
81.1
80
71.1
19.6
3.2
110
5
76
90

Satisfied with course

81.1

Satisfied with teaching

80

Satisfied with feedback

71.1

Student to staff ratio

19.6

Spend per student/10

3.2

Average entry tariff

110

Value added score/10

5

Career after 15 months

76

Contin-uation

90

120
106
West of Scotland
40
84.5
85.7
74.2
22.6
3.3
129
5.1
74
88

Satisfied with course

84.5

Satisfied with teaching

85.7

Satisfied with feedback

74.2

Student to staff ratio

22.6

Spend per student/10

3.3

Average entry tariff

129

Value added score/10

5.1

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

88

121
121
Bedfordshire
30.1
76.2
82.3
71.3
19.7
4.9
101
3.9
74
79

Satisfied with course

76.2

Satisfied with teaching

82.3

Satisfied with feedback

71.3

Student to staff ratio

19.7

Spend per student/10

4.9

Average entry tariff

101

Value added score/10

3.9

Career after 15 months

74

Contin-uation

79

[NEW] Cataloging | great britain คือ – NATAVIGUIDES







Cataloging or Cataloguing or Library Cataloging is the process of creating and maintaining bibliographic and authority records in the library catalog, the database of books, serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, computer files, e-resources etc. that are owned by a library. The catalog may be in tangible form, such as a card catalog or in electronic form, such as online public access catalog (OPAC). Relative to the movement of materials within technical services, cataloging usually follows the receipt of ordered books in acquisitions. The process of cataloging involves three major activities, namely, Descriptive Cataloging, Subject Cataloging, and Authority Control.

Cataloging is a subset of the larger field called .

It can be defined as, “The process of creating metadata for resources by describing a resource, choosing name and title access points, conducting subject analysis, assigning subject headings and classification numbers, and maintaining the system through which the cataloging data is made available.”–Joudrey, Taylor, and Miller (2015). , 11th ed., Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.

In other words, it is the process of creating metadata about library resources, which is included in the
catalog.

See also  เที่ยวเซี่ยงไฮ้ต้องไป!พาเที่ยวถนนหนานจิงหอไข่มุกที่เป็นเอกลักษณ์ที่ห้ามพลาดของเซี่ยงไฮ้I Roam2gether | เมือง เซี่ยงไฮ้

A is an organized compilation of bibliographic metadata that represents the holdings of a particular institution or a library network and/or resources accessible in a particular location.

Cataloging, traditionally, has been seen as comprising two specific activities: and .

DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGING

Descriptive Cataloging or Descriptive Cataloguing includes recording the attributes of a library item, such as the name of author(s), contributor(s), title, edition, publisher, distributor, date, the number of pages, its size, name of series, etc. Descriptive Cataloging enables the user to find and identify a book, by the name of the author, the title, variant titles, etc. Two popular standards for Descriptive Cataloging are Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR) and its successor Resource Description and Access (RDA).

Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR, AACR2, AACR2R)

 – Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR) is the essential international cataloguing code used for descriptive cataloging of various types of information resources by libraries in the United States, Great Britain, Canada, and Australia as well as in many other countries. It was first developed in 1967 and updated regularly until 2005. The revisions and updates of the standard are referred to as AACR2. The second edition of Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2) is the most widely used cataloging code, designed for use in the construction of catalogs and other lists in general libraries of all sizes. AACR2 comprise a detailed set of rules and guidelines for producing metadata in a surrogate record to represent a library resource. The rules cover the standard description of areas like, the title, publisher, edition, series, etc., as well as the provision of choice and form of access points (headings) for all materials which a library may hold or to which it may have access, including books, serials, cartographic materials, electronic resources, etc. AACR also provides rules for the formulation of standard forms of names and titles to provide access to and grouping of those descriptions. AACR2 standardized cataloging and ensured consistency within the catalog and between the catalogs of libraries using the same code in describing the physical attributes of library materials identically. AACR marked a shift from the previous cataloging rules, which were criticized for being too detailed, complex, and mere compilations of rules to handle specific bibliographic cases. Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules are considered as the most important advances in English-language codes for descriptive cataloging during the twentieth century.

Resource Description and Access (RDA)

 – RDA stands for “Resource Description and Access” and is the title of the standard, that is the successor to AACR2. Resource Description and Access (RDA) is a standard for descriptive cataloging providing instructions and guidelines on formulating bibliographic data. Resource Description & Access (RDA) is a set of cataloging instructions based on FRBR and FRAD, for producing the description and name and title access points representing a resource. RDA offers libraries the potential to change significantly how bibliographic data is created and used. RDA is a standard for resource description and access designed for the digital world. It provides (i) A flexible framework for describing all resources (analog and digital) that is extensible for new types of material, (ii) Data that is readily adaptable to new and emerging database structures, (iii) Data that is compatible with existing records in online library catalogs. RDA is a package of data elements, guidelines, and instructions for creating library and cultural heritage resource metadata that are well-formed according to international models for user-focused linked data applications. RDA goes beyond earlier cataloging codes in that it provides guidelines on cataloging digital resources and places a stronger emphasis on helping users find, identify, select, and obtain the information they want. RDA also supports the clustering of bibliographic records in order to show relationships between works and their creators.

Janis L. Young and  Daniel N. Joudrey¹ describe Descriptive Cataloging as below:

– Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR) is the essential international cataloguing code used for descriptive cataloging of various types of information resources by libraries in the United States, Great Britain, Canada, and Australia as well as in many other countries. It was first developed in 1967 and updated regularly until 2005. The revisions and updates of the standard are referred to as AACR2. The second edition of Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2) is the most widely used cataloging code, designed for use in the construction of catalogs and other lists in general libraries of all sizes. AACR2 comprise a detailed set of rules and guidelines for producing metadata in a surrogate record to represent a library resource. The rules cover the standard description of areas like, the title, publisher, edition, series, etc., as well as the provision of choice and form of access points (headings) for all materials which a library may hold or to which it may have access, including books, serials, cartographic materials, electronic resources, etc. AACR also provides rules for the formulation of standard forms of names and titles to provide access to and grouping of those descriptions. AACR2 standardized cataloging and ensured consistency within the catalog and between the catalogs of libraries using the same code in describing the physical attributes of library materials identically. AACR marked a shift from the previous cataloging rules, which were criticized for being too detailed, complex, and mere compilations of rules to handle specific bibliographic cases. Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules are considered as the most important advances in English-language codes for descriptive cataloging during the twentieth century.

Descriptive Cataloging

  • Identification of the resource

  • Description of the resource

  • Access points for names and titles

  • Authority work for names and titles

Descriptive cataloging is that phase of the cataloging process that is concerned with the identification and description of an information resource, answering questions such as:

  • What is it?
  • What are its distinguishing and significant characteristics?

It is also concerned with encoding this information for machine processing, for example in:

  • A MARC record,
  • An XML encoded description, or
  • A metadata statement compatible with linked data principles.

It is also concerned with the selection of names and titles useful for providing access to the resources and the establishment of authorized access points for names and titles, answering questions such as:

  • What is it called?
  • Who is responsible for its creation?
  • Who else contributed to it?
  • By what form of name or title are they best known?

Descriptive cataloging describes the makeup of an information resource and identifies those entities responsible for its intellectual and/or artistic contents without reference to its classification by subject or to the assignment of subject headings, both of which are the province of subject cataloging.

SUBJECT CATALOGING

Subject Cataloging (or Subject Cataloguing) involves the subject analysis of the resource and providing corresponding subject headings from a controlled vocabulary or subject heading list, such as Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Medical Subject Headings (MESH) and assignment of classification numbers using schemes such as Library of Congress Classification (LCC) or Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC).

Subject Heading is defined as the most specific word or group of words that capture the essence of the subject or one of the subjects of a book or other library material which is selected from a subject heading list containing the preferred subject access terms (controlled vocabulary) and assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record which works as an access point and enables the work to be searched and retrieved by subject from the library catalog database. Classification or Library Classification is the process of arranging, grouping, coding, and organizing books and other library materials on shelves or entries of a catalog, bibliography, and index according to their subject in a systematic, logical, and helpful order by way of assigning them call numbers using a library classification system, so that users can find them as quickly and easily as possible. Use of classification enables library users to browse on shelves to find its materials, determines the place of a book and the shelf, and also collocates additional items on the same or related subjects. Classification also enables the library users to find out what documents the library has on a certain subject. The cataloger assigns a classification, or call number, in correlation with the subject headings.

Janis L. Young and  Daniel N. Joudrey¹ describe Subject Cataloging as below:

Subject cataloging is the phase of the cataloging process which is concerned with determining and describing the intellectual or artistic content and the genre/form characteristics of a resource, and translating that understanding into subject headings and classification notations.

After the resource’s  has been determined, as many subject headings as are appropriate are chosen from a standard list. There are many such lists, including:  (known as LCSH), the  (which is often referred to as MeSH), the Art and Architecture Thesaurus, and so on.

In addition, a classification notation is chosen from whatever classification scheme is used by the library. In the United States, the most likely candidates are the Library of Congress Classification (often referred to as LCC) or the Dewey Decimal Classification (known as DDC).

Traditionally in the U.S., the classification serves as a means for bringing a resource into close proximity with other resources on the same or related subjects. In the case of tangible resources, the classification is the first element of the call number, which is a device used to identify and locate a particular resource on the shelves. 

Subject Cataloging Phases

  • Two Phases of Subject Cataloging

    • Conceptual analysis
      • What is it about?
      • What is its form or genre?
    • Translation
      • Controlled vocabulary terms
      • Classification

Two popular methods of Subject Cataloging are: (1) Controlled vocabulary terms, and (2) Classification schemes. One popular controlled vocabulary terms list is the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and one popular library classification scheme is the Library of Congress Classification. These are described in brief below:

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)

 – Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is the list of headings produced from the subject authority file maintained by the United States Library of Congress for use in bibliographic records. It is popularly known by its abbreviation as LCSH and is sometimes used interchangeably with the phrase subject authority file. LCSH is a multidisciplinary vocabulary that includes headings in all subjects, from science to religion, to history, social science, education, literature, and philosophy. It also includes headings for geographic features, ethnic groups, historical events, building names, etc. Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is the most widely used subject vocabulary in the world. It is the model for many other vocabularies in English and other languages and has been translated into numerous languages. The strongest aspect of LCSH is that it represents subject headings of the Library of Congress, the national library of the United States, one of the richest of national libraries of the world. The administrative and managerial machinery of LC has made it possible for LCSH to stand out as an undisputed leader. LCSH is also used as indexing vocabulary in a number of published bibliographies. LCSH comprise a thesaurus or a controlled vocabulary of subject headings which is used by a cataloger or an indexer to assign subject headings to a bibliographic record to represent the subject of a work he/she is cataloging. LCSH contain the preferred subject access terms (controlled vocabulary) that are assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record which works as an access point and enables the work to be searched and retrieved by subject from the library catalog database. The controlled vocabulary identifies synonym terms and selects one preferred term among them to be used as the subject heading. For homonyms, it explicitly identifies the multiple concepts expressed by that word or phrase. Cross-references are used with headings to direct the user from terms not used as headings to the term that is used, and from broader and related topics to the one chosen to represent a given subject. The fortieth edition of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH 40) contains headings established by the Library through January 2018. The headings included in this list were obtained by creating a file consisting of all subject heading and subdivision records in verified status in the subject authority file at the Library of Congress. There were 342,947 authority records in the file then. The subject authority database from which the headings in this edition were drawn indicates that the file contains approximately 24,390 personal name headings of which 23,272 represent family names, 10,034 corporate headings, 6 meeting or conference headings, 481 uniform titles, 242,511 topical subject headings, and 61,885 geographic subject headings. There are 764 general USE references, 4,351 general see also references, 299,751 references from one usable heading to another, and 362,646 references from unused terms to used headings. The creation and revision of subject headings is a continuous process. Approximately 5,000 new headings, including headings with subdivisions, are added to LCSH each year. Proposals for new headings and revisions to existing ones are submitted by catalogers at the Library of Congress and by participants in the Subject Authority Cooperative Program (SACO). More information on SACO may be found at <URL http://www.loc.gov/aba/pcc>. Approved proposals become part of the online authority file of subject headings at the Library of Congress, from which various publications are created. Five services provide information about new and revised headings. First, a distribution service supplies the subject headings in the MARC 21 authorities format via Internet FTP on a weekly basis to supplement the master database file of subject authority records. Second, L.C. Subject Headings Monthly Lists are a timely source of information about new and changed subject headings, class numbers, references and scope notes. The lists are posted monthly to the World Wide Web at http://www.loc.gov/aba/cataloging/subject/weeklylists. Third, Classification Web provides World Wide Web access to Library of Congress Subject Headings and Library of Congress Classification to subscribers. Fourth, subject authority records are included in the Library’s Web authorities service and may be searched and viewed at http://authorities.loc.gov. Fifth, subject authorities are freely available for searching and download through the Library’s Linked Data Service at http://id.loc.gov.

Library of Congress Classification

– The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. It was developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to organize and arrange the book collections of the Library of Congress. Over the course of the twentieth century, the system was adopted for use by other libraries as well, especially large academic libraries in the United States. It is currently one of the most widely used library classification systems in the world. The Library’s Policy and Standards Division maintains and develops the system. In recent decades, as the Library of Congress made its records available electronically through its online catalog, more libraries have adopted LCC for both subject cataloging as well as shelflisting. There are several classification schemes in use worldwide. Besides LCC, the other popular ones among them are Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), and Bliss Bibliographic Classification (BC). Out of these, DDC and LCC are the classification systems which are most commonly used in libraries. The potential of Library of Congress Classification (LCC) system is yet to be explored in libraries. This article describes the various aspects of LCC and its suitability as a library classification system for classifying library resources. The Library of Congress was established in 1800 when the American legislatures were preparing to move from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington, D.C. Its earliest classification system was by size and, within each size group, by accession number. First recorded change in the arrangement of the collection appeared in the library’s third catalog, issued in 1808, which showed added categories for special bibliographic forms such as legal documents and executive papers. On the night of August 24, 1814, during the war of 1812, British soldiers set fire to the Capitol, and most of the Library of Congress’s collections were destroyed. Sometimes after, Thomas Jefferson offered to sell to Congress his personal library; subsequently, in 1815, the Congress purchased Jefferson’s personal library of 6,487 books. The books arrived already classified by Jefferson’s own system. The library adopted this system and used it with some modifications until the end of the nineteenth century. Library of Congress moved to a new building in 1897. By this time, the Library’s collection had grown to one and a half million volumes and it was decided that Jefferson’s classification system was no longer adequate for the collection. A more detailed classification scheme was required for such a huge and rapidly growing collection of documents. The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), Cutter’s Expansive Classification and the German Halle Schema were studied, but none was considered suitable. It was decided to construct a new system to be called the Library of Congress Classification (LCC). James C.M. Hanson, Head of the Catalog Division, and Charles Martel, Chief Classifier, were made responsible for developing the new scheme. Hanson and Martel concluded that the new classification should be based on Cutter’s Expansive Classification⁴ as a guide for the order of classes, but with a considerably modified notation. Work on the new classification began in 1901. The first outline of the Library of Congress Classification was published in 1904 by Charles Martel and J.C.M. Hanson – the two fathers of Library of Congress Classification. Class Z (Bibliography and Library Science) was chosen to be the first schedule to be developed. The next schedules, E-F (American history and geography), were developed. But E-F were the first schedules to be published, in 1901, followed by Z in 1902. Other schedules were progressively developed. Each schedule of LCC contains an entire class, a subclass, or a group of subclasses. The separate schedules were published in print volumes, as they were completed. All schedules were published by 1948, except the Class K (Law). The first Law schedule—the Law of United States, was published in 1969, and the last of the Law schedules to publish was KB—Religious law, which appeared in 2004. From the beginning, individual schedules of LCC have been developed and maintained by subject experts. Such experts continue to be responsible for additions and changes in LCC. The separate development of individual schedules meant that, unlike other classification systems, LCC was not the product of one mastermind; indeed, LCC has been called “a coordinated series of special classes”. Until the early 1990s, LCC schedules existed mainly as a print product. The conversion of LCC to machine-readable form began in 1993 and was completed in 1996. The conversion to electronic form was done using USMARC (now called MARC21) Classification Format. This was a very important development for LCC, as it enabled LCC to be consulted online and much more efficient production of the print schedules. In the year 2013, the Library of Congress announced a transition to online-only publication of its cataloging documentation, including the Library of Congress Classification. It was decided, the Library’s Cataloging Distribution Service (CDS) will no longer print new editions of its subject headings, classification schedules, and other cataloging publications. The Library decided to provide free downloadable PDF versions of LCC schedules. For users desiring enhanced functionality, the Library’s two web-based subscription services, Cataloger’s Desktop and Classification Web will continue as products from CDS. Classification Web is a web-based tool for LCC and LCSH. It supports searching and browsing of the LCC schedules and provides links to the respective tables to build the class numbers for library resources. LC has also developed training materials on the principles and practices of LCC and made those available for free on its website.

Two popular methods of Subject Cataloging are: (1) Controlled vocabulary terms, and (2) Classification schemes. One popular controlled vocabulary terms list is the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and one popular library classification scheme is the Library of Congress Classification. These are described in brief below:- The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. It was developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to organize and arrange the book collections of the Library of Congress. Over the course of the twentieth century, the system was adopted for use by other libraries as well, especially large academic libraries in the United States. It is currently one of the most widely used library classification systems in the world. The Library’s Policy and Standards Division maintains and develops the system. In recent decades, as the Library of Congress made its records available electronically through its online catalog, more libraries have adopted LCC for both subject cataloging as well as shelflisting. There are several classification schemes in use worldwide. Besides LCC, the other popular ones among them are Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), and Bliss Bibliographic Classification (BC). Out of these, DDC and LCC are the classification systems which are most commonly used in libraries. The potential of Library of Congress Classification (LCC) system is yet to be explored in libraries. This article describes the various aspects of LCC and its suitability as a library classification system for classifying library resources. The Library of Congress was established in 1800 when the American legislatures were preparing to move from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington, D.C. Its earliest classification system was by size and, within each size group, by accession number. First recorded change in the arrangement of the collection appeared in the library’s third catalog, issued in 1808, which showed added categories for special bibliographic forms such as legal documents and executive papers. On the night of August 24, 1814, during the war of 1812, British soldiers set fire to the Capitol, and most of the Library of Congress’s collections were destroyed. Sometimes after, Thomas Jefferson offered to sell to Congress his personal library; subsequently, in 1815, the Congress purchased Jefferson’s personal library of 6,487 books. The books arrived already classified by Jefferson’s own system. The library adopted this system and used it with some modifications until the end of the nineteenth century. Library of Congress moved to a new building in 1897. By this time, the Library’s collection had grown to one and a half million volumes and it was decided that Jefferson’s classification system was no longer adequate for the collection. A more detailed classification scheme was required for such a huge and rapidly growing collection of documents. The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), Cutter’s Expansive Classification and the German Halle Schema were studied, but none was considered suitable. It was decided to construct a new system to be called the Library of Congress Classification (LCC). James C.M. Hanson, Head of the Catalog Division, and Charles Martel, Chief Classifier, were made responsible for developing the new scheme. Hanson and Martel concluded that the new classification should be based on Cutter’s Expansive Classification⁴ as a guide for the order of classes, but with a considerably modified notation. Work on the new classification began in 1901. The first outline of the Library of Congress Classification was published in 1904 by Charles Martel and J.C.M. Hanson – the two fathers of Library of Congress Classification. Class Z (Bibliography and Library Science) was chosen to be the first schedule to be developed. The next schedules, E-F (American history and geography), were developed. But E-F were the first schedules to be published, in 1901, followed by Z in 1902. Other schedules were progressively developed. Each schedule of LCC contains an entire class, a subclass, or a group of subclasses. The separate schedules were published in print volumes, as they were completed. All schedules were published by 1948, except the Class K (Law). The first Law schedule—the Law of United States, was published in 1969, and the last of the Law schedules to publish was KB—Religious law, which appeared in 2004. From the beginning, individual schedules of LCC have been developed and maintained by subject experts. Such experts continue to be responsible for additions and changes in LCC. The separate development of individual schedules meant that, unlike other classification systems, LCC was not the product of one mastermind; indeed, LCC has been called “a coordinated series of special classes”. Until the early 1990s, LCC schedules existed mainly as a print product. The conversion of LCC to machine-readable form began in 1993 and was completed in 1996. The conversion to electronic form was done using USMARC (now called MARC21) Classification Format. This was a very important development for LCC, as it enabled LCC to be consulted online and much more efficient production of the print schedules. In the year 2013, the Library of Congress announced a transition to online-only publication of its cataloging documentation, including the Library of Congress Classification. It was decided, the Library’s Cataloging Distribution Service (CDS) will no longer print new editions of its subject headings, classification schedules, and other cataloging publications. The Library decided to provide free downloadable PDF versions of LCC schedules. For users desiring enhanced functionality, the Library’s two web-based subscription services, Cataloger’s Desktop and Classification Web will continue as products from CDS. Classification Web is a web-based tool for LCC and LCSH. It supports searching and browsing of the LCC schedules and provides links to the respective tables to build the class numbers for library resources. LC has also developed training materials on the principles and practices of LCC and made those available for free on its website.

AUTHORITY CONTROL

It is a process that organizes bibliographic information in library catalogs by using a single, distinct spelling of a name (heading) or a subject for each topic, called an authority record. Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name, corporate name, family name, place name, uniform or preferred title, series title, subject, etc. in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items. To ensure consistency, an authority record is created for each authorized heading (authorized access point) for a proper name or a subject, etc. An authority record is made when a heading is established, i.e., authorized for use as the main entry (preferred title and, if appropriate, the authorized access point for the creator), an added entry, or subject entry, for the first time, while cataloging of a library item. Authority control is the process that is applied to both descriptive and subject analysis parts of cataloging. It ensures the consistency and correctness of names and subject headings entered into the bibliographic description.

ororis the process of creating and maintaining bibliographic and authority records in the library catalog, the database of books, serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, computer files, e-resources etc. that are owned by a library. The catalog may be in tangible form, such as a card catalog or in electronic form, such as online public access catalog (OPAC). Relative to the movement of materials within technical services, cataloging usually follows the receipt of ordered books in acquisitions. The process of cataloging involves three major activities, namely, Descriptive Cataloging, Subject Cataloging, and Authority Control. In libraries, metadata creation is often called cataloging¹.Cataloging is a subset of the larger field calledIt can be defined as, “The process of creating metadata for resources by describing a resource, choosing name and title access points, conducting subject analysis, assigning subject headings and classification numbers, and maintaining the system through which the cataloging data is made available.”–Joudrey, Taylor, and Miller (2015)., 11th ed., Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.In other words, it is the process of creating metadata about library resources, which is included in thecatalog.is an organized compilation of bibliographic metadata that represents the holdings of a particular institution or a library network and/or resources accessible in a particular location.Cataloging, traditionally, has been seen as comprising two specific activities:andorincludes recording the attributes of a library item, such as the name of author(s), contributor(s), title, edition, publisher, distributor, date, the number of pages, its size, name of series, etc. Descriptive Cataloging enables the user to find and identify a book, by the name of the author, the title, variant titles, etc. Two popular standards for Descriptive Cataloging are Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR) and its successor Resource Description and Access (RDA).Descriptive cataloging is that phase of the cataloging process that is concerned with the identification and description of an information resource, answering questions such as:It is also concerned with encoding this information for machine processing, for example in:It is also concerned with the selection of names and titles useful for providing access to the resources and the establishment of authorized access points for names and titles, answering questions such as:Descriptive cataloging describes the makeup of an information resource and identifies those entities responsible for its intellectual and/or artistic contents without reference to its classification by subject or to the assignment of subject headings, both of which are the province of subject cataloging.involves the subject analysis of the resource and providing corresponding subject headings from a controlled vocabulary or subject heading list, such as Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Medical Subject Headings (MESH) and assignment of classification numbers using schemes such as Library of Congress Classification (LCC) or Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC).Subject Heading is defined as the most specific word or group of words that capture the essence of the subject or one of the subjects of a book or other library material which is selected from a subject heading list containing the preferred subject access terms (controlled vocabulary) and assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record which works as an access point and enables the work to be searched and retrieved by subject from the library catalog database. Classification or Library Classification is the process of arranging, grouping, coding, and organizing books and other library materials on shelves or entries of a catalog, bibliography, and index according to their subject in a systematic, logical, and helpful order by way of assigning them call numbers using a library classification system, so that users can find them as quickly and easily as possible. Use of classification enables library users to browse on shelves to find its materials, determines the place of a book and the shelf, and also collocates additional items on the same or related subjects. Classification also enables the library users to find out what documents the library has on a certain subject. The cataloger assigns a classification, or call number, in correlation with the subject headings.It is a process that organizes bibliographic information in library catalogs by using a single, distinct spelling of a name (heading) or a subject for each topic, called an authority record. Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name, corporate name, family name, place name, uniform or preferred title, series title, subject, etc. in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items. To ensure consistency, an authority record is created for each authorized heading (authorized access point) for a proper name or a subject, etc. An authority record is made when a heading is established, i.e., authorized for use as the main entry (preferred title and, if appropriate, the authorized access point for the creator), an added entry, or subject entry, for the first time, while cataloging of a library item. Authority control is the process that is applied to both descriptive and subject analysis parts of cataloging. It ensures the consistency and correctness of names and subject headings entered into the bibliographic description.


History of Britain in 20 Minutes


This is the entire history of Britain in a nutshell. From Anglo Saxons, Vikings, conquests, tea, the British empire, and current events
Follow US: https://twitter.com/VC3Production
How long did it take you to make this video?
Short answer: Too Bleeping Long (well over 100 hours as I had to remake this)
(I started in around December and research before then)
What software/equipment did you use to make this video?
After effects, Illustrator, Premier Pro, Audacity, Yeti microphone,
Believe it or not this is in a nutshell compared to the amount of research that went into this
Obviously we’ve simplified some events just for the sake of time and missed people and events that can be covered in other videos
Do people still read? Eh if your reading this then yes.

The rise and fall of the British empire.\” By Lawrence James.
Scotland the story of a nation by Magnus Magnusson
The AngloSaxon Chronicles by Michael Swanton
\”England’s Glorious Revolution 16881689: A Brief History with Documents\” by Steven C. A. Pincus
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/politics/eu_referendum/results
https://ig.ft.com/sites/numbers/economies/uk
https://www.amazon.com/WarsRosesAlisonWeir/dp/0345404335/ref=la_B000AQ41I6_1_1_title_1_pap?s=books\u0026ie=UTF8\u0026qid=1417451322\u0026sr=11
Additional notes/video errors
2.06 3.13 the grey areas show how different the Britain coastline was back then
Bengal is a region not a city
At 18:42 the map doesn’t show the full extent of British rule in India
Music Used:
All music by Kevin Macleod (incompetech.com) licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Local Forecast – Elevator
All this
Amazing music by Derek \u0026 Brandon Fiechter
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjMZjGhrFq_4llVS_x2XJ_w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAT0BBlSXMY
Amazing music by Alexander Nakarada
Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
https://soundcloud.com/serpentsoundstudios/darkcelticgjallarroyaltyfreedownload
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxMnDvN6Ag
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Amazing music by Ross Bugden
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQKGLOK2FqmVgVwYferltKQ
Epic and Dramatic Trailer Music ♪♬ Olympus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnmglWHoVrk
Dramatic Apocalyptic Music ♪♬ The Wasteland
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eAalHA1bAc
House Targaryen Theme Game of Thrones Season 4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4L8IQ36fBM
Amazing music by MultiMusic
Multi Imperium
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPhfTgayGWQ

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูเพิ่มเติม

History of Britain in 20 Minutes

Studying English: the British Isles


Begrepen.be:
What are the British Isles? What is the difference between the UK, Great Britain and England? What’s up with all the different ‘Irelands’? Learn all you need to know about the British Isles and all its regions here.
Begrepen.be. Explaining stuff.

Studying English: the British Isles

HÀ LAN: ĐẤT NƯỚC THIÊN ĐƯỜNG | PHỐ ĐÈN ĐỎ ĐÌNH ĐÁM NHẤT THẾ GIỚI


BlvHaiThanh BLVHảiThanh BLVhaiThanhStory HàLan
HÀ LAN: ĐẤT NƯỚC THIÊN ĐƯỜNG | PHỐ ĐÈN ĐỎ ĐÌNH ĐÁM NHẤT THẾ GIỚI
Đăng ký kênh tại đây các bạn nhé!
https://bit.ly/blvhaithanh
HàLanThếGioi VănHòa LịchSửViệtNam ChiếnTranhViệtNam ViệtNam ĐếQuốcMỹ TriềuTiên Dântộc ViệtNam VănHóa DuLịch VănHóaViệtNam LịchSửViệtNam QuốcGia LịchSửQuốcGia VietNam LichSuVietNam KỷLục ĐườngSắt ĐườngSắtViệtNam XemGìHômNay Thếgiớiquanhta

HÀ LAN: ĐẤT NƯỚC THIÊN ĐƯỜNG | PHỐ ĐÈN ĐỎ ĐÌNH ĐÁM NHẤT THẾ GIỚI

ENGLISH SPEECH | ANGELINA JOLIE: What We Stand For? (English Subtitles)


Learn English with Angelina Jolie at United Stations Geneva in 2017. Jolie was given the honorable and weighty task of delivering the Sergio Vieira de Mello Foundation lecture, named after a UN diplomat who was killed while on assignment in Iraq in 2003. Angelina Jolie is an American actress, filmmaker, and humanitarian. She has received an Academy Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards, and has been cited as Hollywood’s highestpaid actress. Watch with big English subtitles.
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ENGLISH SPEECH | ANGELINA JOLIE: What We Stand For? (English Subtitles)

EU4 1.32 England Guide – THIS Is How YOU WIN as England


2nd Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWpgb8x6L5pCuakP_137lqA
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In this video titled EU4 1.32 England Guide THIS Is How YOU WIN as England I make an EU4 Guide for England for Europa Universalis 1.32 Origins. With EU4 1.32 Origins releasing the meta and the starting moves for many nations on the map has changed, so of course new and up to date guides are needed. This EU4 England starting moves guide or EU4 England starting moves tutorial will ensure that you get a great start for yourself playing as the nation of England. This guide covers the opening moves, forming Great Britain, getting the personal union over France in the 100 years war, diplomacy, colonizing, estates, alliances, subjects, missions, national ideas and more! England is one of the best nations for playing wide, having an extremely powerful army and navy, being the richest nation in the world with an economy focused on trade and production, domination Europe and the world and more! England / Great Britain has three unique achievements and they are called Anglophile, An Industrial Evolution and One Night in Paris. After watching this EU4 England guide you will ensure a great start for yourself, and you will have an easy and fun campaign. The save file is available for all Tier 1 and above Youtube members in the savegames Discord channel.
eu4 europauniversalis4

EU4 1.32 England Guide - THIS Is How YOU WIN as England

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูวิธีอื่นๆLEARN FOREIGN LANGUAGE

ขอบคุณที่รับชมกระทู้ครับ great britain คือ

See also  ❤ แอบฝัน - เอกพจน์ วงศ์นาค ❤ [ต้นฉบับ] Original Master | เอกพจน์กับพหูพจน์

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