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[Update] 9+ Relative Clause Examples – PDF | relative clause – NATAVIGUIDES

relative clause: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

Anyone who’s interested in learning the fundamentals of the English language knows how complex the underlying concept of grammar and sentence structures can be.

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Words aren’t just a group of letters joined together, but they serve as a primary element in developing a sentence. We use words to form sentences, sentences to compose paragraphs, and paragraphs to construct essay writings. But between the simple sentences and complex sentences that constitute our paragraphs, comes a group of related words containing a subject and a predicate or verb: clauses.

Defining and Non-Defining Relative Clause Example

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Exercise on Relative Clause Example

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Free Relative Clause Worksheet Example

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What You Should Know about Clauses

It’s easy to recognize a clause when you see one. For instance, though a close does not end with a punctuation, it can express a complete or an incomplete thought.

There are two main types of clauses: the independent clause and the dependent clause. An independent clause (or a main clause) follows a Subject + Verb = Complete Thought pattern. Take note that every sentence must consist of at least one main clause. Otherwise, it may be considered as a sentence fragment.

A dependent clause (or a subordinate clause), on the other hand, consists of a group of words with both a subject and a verb that do not convey a complete thought. Instead, it follows a unique pattern with a Subordinating Conjunction + Subject + Verb = Incomplete Thought. Since a dependent clause can never stand on its own, it must be joined with a main clause to communicate a sensible message to its receiver. You may also see clause examples.

Additionally, subordinate clauses are also classified into three different categories, namely noun clauses, adverb clauses, and relative or adjective clauses, which shall be discussed later on in the article.

To understand how these clauses are used, let’s take a look at the following examples:

Cameron is older than his sister.

The example above is an independent clause that can also be classified as a simple sentence. To turn this clause into a dependent clause, you can add subordinating conjunction or a dependent word to the beginning of the clause such as:

Because Cameron is older than his sister

Once the conjunction “because” is added to the clause, it no longer makes sense knowing that there is something missing in the expression. To fix this, you can either remove the conjunction or attach a main clause to the example. You may also like subordinate clause examples.

Because Cameron is older than his sister, he likes to boss her around. 

By combining an independent clause with one or more dependent clauses, you can turn a simple sentence into a complex sentence similar to the example provided above.

Printable Relative Clause Worksheet Example

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Relative Clause Example

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Relative Clause Exercise Example

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Relative Clause Sample Worksheet

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What Is a Relative Clause?

A relative clause is a dependent clause used to provide additional information in a sentence by defining the noun given. This may also be referred to as an adjective clause, an adjectival clause, or a relative construction. This usually adapts, describes, or modifies a noun or a noun phrase, and is introduced by a relative pronoun (that, which, who, whom, whose) or a relative adverb (why, when, where). You may also see subordinate clause examples.

Defining and Non-Defining Relative Clauses

When defining a relative clause, it’s important to point its two primary types: the defining (or restrictive) relative clauses and the non-defining (or non-restrictive) relative clauses.

A defining relative clause supplies essential information about the noun to which it is referring to in the sentence. One thing to take note of is that the clause cannot be taken away from the sentence without affecting its meaning; otherwise, the remaining words may communicate something different than what the writer intended. You may also like adverb clause examples.

Let’s take this for example.

It reminded him of the brownies that his grandmother used to bake.

If we eliminate the clause being highlighted in the sentence, though it would still convey a complete thought, the idea of the sentence would be less specific and it would not make actual sense. Instead, this would leave readers wondering, “What brownies did it remind him of?” You may also check out compound sentences – writing methods & examples.

On the contrary, non-defining relative clauses provide additional information about a noun. Since the clause is nothing more than a mere accessory in the sentence, it can be dropped without affecting the meaning or structure of the given general statement.

The items inside the vault, which is believed to consist of family heirlooms, were stolen by German thieves.

Once we remove the highlighted clause in the example, the sentence would still make perfect sense. Providing a bit of background context about the noun is a common strategy that writers use to describe a noun even further without changing the overall though of a sentence. You may also see balanced sentences — usage and examples.

Take note that we can easily distinguish a defining relative clause from a non-defining relative clause by the simple use of a comma. If a comma or commas are used to separate the clause from the rest of the sentence, then the clause is simply non-defining. Otherwise, it would be a defining relative clause. You may also like conditional sentence – definition and examples.

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1. To Post-Modify a Noun

Relative clauses may be used in various ways. For one, we use relative clauses to post-modify a noun. This is done to provide specifics about the person or thing we are referring to in a sentence. The relative pronouns who, which, whose, and that are used to introduce these clauses. You may also check out exculpatory clause examples.

As a Subject

In this category, the relative pronoun IS the subject of the sentence, therefore we do not repeat the subject after it has already been mentioned.

Examples:

  • Isn’t that the guy who sat beside you in English Literature class?
  • The firefighters said that the incident that happened last night was bound to happen.
  • The radio reported that the bear which killed its keeper has been put down.

As an Object of a Clause

For this category, the relative pronoun acts as the object of the clause.

Examples:

  • You shouldn’t believe everything that you read on the Internet.
  • The condo unit that we rented in Los Angeles was fully furnished.
  • The weather was certainly the thing which I enjoyed most about our vacation.

In most cases, when a relative pronoun is the object of its clause, it’s acceptable to leave it out.

  • You shouldn’t believe everything you read on the Internet.
  • The condo unit we rented in Los Angeles was fully furnished.
  • The weather was certainly the thing I enjoyed most about our vacation.

You might be interested in simple sentence examples.

As an Object of a Preposition  

Once a relative pronoun is used as the object of a preposition in the sentence, the preposition is usually placed after the verb.

Examples:

  • Who was the man who you were talking to? OR Who was the man you were talking to?
  • That’s the school that my sister goes to. OR That’s the school my sister goes to.
  • I haven’t watched the movie which you were talking about. OR I haven’t watched the movie you were talking about.

Keep in mind that when the pronouns who, which, or whose are used in the sentence, they sometimes come at the beginning of the clause. You may also see fused sentence — examples and corrections.

2. Times and Places

The relative adverbs when and where to indicate time and place respectively are also highly recommended to provide clarity in the statement.

Examples: 

  • Do you remember the place where we had our first date? OR Do you remember the place we had our first date?
  • My mother’s birthday is the day when the Great Earthquake struck San Francisco. OR My mother’s birthday is the day the Great Earthquake struck San Francisco.

Even if the relative pronoun or relative adverb from each clause has been omitted, it can still be classified as a relative clause due to its function in the sentence. You may also like compound sentence—usage and examples.

3. To Provide Additional Information

As previously mentioned, a relative clause may be used to tell us something more about a person or thing being referred to in the sentence. The relative clause may be categorized as a defining or non-defining relative clause, depending on how it is used in the sentence. You may also check out cumulative sentence examples.

4. To Quantify with Relative Pronouns

We can also use quantifiers and numbers with relative pronouns. This can be used as a subject, object, or object of a preposition.

For example:

She has three brothers, two of whom are doctors.

Expressions such as many of whom, most of whom, one of which, none of whom, some of which, lots of whom, and two of which are also examples of quantifiers and numbers combined with relative pronouns to form a relative clause. You might be interested in parallel sentences—structure and examples.

Relative Clause Worksheet Example

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Simple Relative Clause Worksheet Example

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Teaching Relative Clauses Example

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Examples of Relative Clauses

  1. I’m looking for a secretary that can work under pressure and use a computer well.
  2. She has a son who is in the army.
  3. We bought a mansion, which is 200 years old, for over a $10 million.
  4. I sent a postcard that arrived five weeks later.
  5. The woman that my brother is going to marry is from New Zealand.
  6. The caregiver who my grandpa liked lives in New Hampshire.
  7. My mother’s house, which I grew up in, was demolished the other day.
  8. The photographer called to Queen Elizabeth, who looked irritated by the gesture.
  9. Last week I bought a new mobile phone, which does not function now.
  10. My stepsister, who I grew up with, knows a lot about motorbikes and cars.

Learning the purpose and proper use of clauses gives us the opportunity to enhance our way of writing in more ways than one. Instead of writing paragraphs upon paragraphs of short sentences, we can easily write a more detailed composition that accurately expresses our thoughts in such a way that readers may still comprehend.

Going beyond one’s expectations in writing by joining different types of clauses together can help us connect with readers in a more accurate and interesting manner.

[Update] Relative clauses in English | relative clause – NATAVIGUIDES

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You are here :

Relative
clauses in English

 Forms
and
functions of relative clauses in English grammar

relative
clauses

,
using the principal relative pronouns

who that

and

which

.
For information on

nominal
relative
clauses

, and on other relative pronouns or adjectives such
as

whatever

or

when

or

whenever

,
see

part 2

Relative pronouns
and adjectives

This page looks at standard, using the principal relative pronounsandFor information on, and on other relative pronouns or adjectives such asoror, see

Cette page en français: ►

Les
propositions
relatives en anglais

1. Clauses with the
relative
pronoun as

subject

1.1. When the relative pronoun is

subject

of
a clause and refers to a human,
the
relative pronoun

who

is
generally used.
Examples

who is replaced by that,
especially
in American English and in spoken language: 
Examples

However,

.

is also quite possible.

After the antecedent those, is
almost always required:

However,is also quite possible.After the antecedentis almost always required:

1.2.If the relative is the subject
of
a clause and refers to an inanimate antecedent, or
must be used.
Examples

1.3.
IMPORTANT:

Omission

:As
subject
of
a clause, the relative pronoun

can
never
be omitted.

However, the relative clause can be completely
omitted:
Examples

The
book
is on the table is mine

  is quite impossible,
but
  is
perfectly acceptable.

2. Clauses with the
relative
pronoun as

object:

Even if the relative pronoun is the object of the clause, it still
stands at the start of the clause.

When the relative pronoun is the direct object of
the clause, and refers to a human,
the pronoun used is either or .
Examples

Alternatively, the relative

can

be omitted, particularly in spoken language:
The relative, whether mentioned or not, is the only object of the
clause, and there can be no second object following the verb.
Thus we

cannot
say or write :

nor  

Alternatively, the relative, particularly in spoken language:The relative, whether mentioned or not, is the only object of the clause, and there can be no second object following the verb.Thus wenor

is not used very often: ,
or omission
of the relative pronoun, are much more common.

When an is
referred to, the same rules apply, except that
is never used: it is replaced by .
Examples

or
or

are all possible   

are all possible

Omission

:

when it is the object of
the relative clause, the relative pronoun can often be omitted,
particularly in written English. as in the
last example.

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from Google

< >

3.
The relative pronoun as a possessive

is
required with both animate and inanimate antecedents: it is the only
derivative
of which can refer to animates

and

inanimates:
Examples

4.
Relative
clauses starting with a

prepositon

:

4.1. Note how to form relative clauses after prepositions:

 

preposition + which

for
inanimates or things,

preposition
+ whom

for people.  Stylistically, this is quite
formal.  

Sometimes

,
when referring to

places or locations

,

in which

can be replaced
by

where

;  when
referring to time,

when

is
generally preferred to

at which
(moment / point)

 
Examples

In the town

where

I was born lived a man who
sailed to sea

(Beatles: Yellow Submarine)
  

4.2.  If the relative pronoun is omitted, then the
preposition must come at the end of the clause. Omission of the
relative
pronoun in examples like the ones below is actually by far the most
common usage in modern spoken English, and is also common in written
style.
Examples

   

5. More complex
structures:

Examples
5.1 Preposition + possession:

.

5.2. Selective possession

5.1 Preposition + possession:5.2. Selective possession

6.
Defining
and non-defining relative clauses.

6.1. A

“Defining”

relative clause (also called a restrictive or integrated
relative clause) is one which is
essential for the understanding of a statement.
Example

protestors
who smash windows” will be arrested; but suggests that those who do not
smash windows will not be arrested. .
The word “protestors” in
this example is restricted by the relative clause that defines it.
 
 Commas are not required before
and after the relative clause.

6.2. In a

non-defining

relative clause (also called a non-restrictive
relative clause or a supplementary relative clause)
, the
relative
clause is

not

essential
for an understanding of the sentence:
Examples

In the second, it is obvious that it is

cars in general

,
not cars from the late 19th century, that are a vital part of modern
life.
The relative clause can be omitted without making
the sentence meaningless.
     In cases like this,

commas

are
usually required

before and after the relative clause.

Compare these two examples:
Examples

6.3. Using

that

instead of

who

or

which

in relative clauses

  • The relative pronoun

    that

    may be used in English, particularly American English, in

    defining

     relative clauses.

  •  

    That

    cannot replace

    who

    or

    which

      in

    non-defining

    relative clauses.

  However use of

that

instead of

who

or

which

in defining clauses is an

option

,
not a rule, and a source of plenty of confusion.
Some grammar books suggest that

which

or

who

must

be used
in defining relative clauses, and that

that

must

be used in non-defining relative clauses, but this is not true, not
even in American English, and countless quotes from the best authors
demonstrate this.

Don’t rely on grammar checkers that come with word-processing
software.

 
Furthermore the grammar-check tool on Microsoft Word can be either
confusing or just wrong on this point. When the example above, was put through the MS Word grammar
checker, the group  was
underlined, and the first “correction” suggested was:

 ..

without

commas

In
this case, the grammar checker has replaced a perfectly acceptable
sentence, with the necessary commas, with a sentence that is

grammatically wrong

!  Without commas, the relative clause becomes  a
defining clause, and the sentence now implies that
which is clearly not the case.

7. Relative
clauses
which qualify a whole sentence

1.1. When the relative pronoun isof a clause and refers to a, the relative pronounis generally used.Sometimes,is replaced by, especially in American English and in spoken language:.If the relative is theof a clause and refers to anantecedent,ormust be used.:Asof a clause, the relative pronounHowever, the relative clause can be completely omitted:Even if the relative pronoun is the object of the clause, it still stands at the start of the clause.When the relative pronoun is theof the clause, and refers to a, the pronoun used is eitheroris not used very often:, or omission of the relative pronoun, are much more common.When anis referred to, the same rules apply, except thatis never used: it is replaced bywhen it is the object of the relative clause, the relative pronoun can often be omitted, particularlyas in the last example.is required with both animate and inanimate antecedents: it is thederivative ofwhich can refer to animatesinanimates:4.1. Note how to form relative clauses after prepositions:for inanimates or things,for people. Stylistically, this is quite formal., when referring tocan be replaced by; when referring to time,is generally preferred to4.2. If the relative pronoun is omitted, then the preposition must come at the end of the clause. Omission of the relative pronoun in examples like the ones below is actually by far the most common usage in modern spoken English, and is also common in written style.6.1. Arelative clause (also called aorrelative clause) is one which is essential for the understanding of a statement.The first example tells us that “protestors who smash windows” will be arrested; but suggests that those who dosmash windows willbe arrested. . The word “protestors” in this example is restricted by the relative clause that defines it.before and after the relative clause.6.2. In arelative clause (also called arelative clause or arelative clause) , the relative clause isessential for an understanding of the sentence:In the first of these examples, the question of age is not an essential bit of information.In the second, it is obvious that it is, not cars from the late 19th century, that are a vital part of modern life.The relative clause can be omitted without making the sentence meaningless.In cases like this,before and after the relative clause.Compare these two examples:However use ofinstead oforin defining clauses is an, not a rule, and a source of plenty of confusion.Some grammar books suggest thatorbe used in defining relative clauses, and thatbe used in non-defining relative clauses, but this is not true, not even in American English, and countless quotes from the best authors demonstrate this.Furthermore the grammar-check tool on Microsoft Word can be either confusing or just wrong on this point. When the example above,was put through the MS Word grammar checker, the groupwas underlined, and the first “correction” suggested was:

Sometimes we use a relative clause to qualify not just
a noun or pronoun, but a whole sentence or clause. In such cases, the
relative clause is introduced by which,never that
or what
.

Examples

8. Omission
of
the relative pronoun

This point is dealt with above in the sections 2, 3 and 4 above.
Note in particular the question of omitting the relative pronoun in a
   English grammar books sometimes say that it is
bad style to end a sentence with a

must

come
at the end of the clause, even if this is also the end of the sentence.
As stated above, omission of the relative pronoun in prepositional
relative clauses is normal style in modern English.
Examples

►  Continue to part 2 :  

This point is dealt with above in the sections 2, 3 and 4 above.Note in particular the question of omitting the relative pronoun in a prepositional
relative
clause  
(point 4).English grammar books sometimes say that it is bad style to end a sentence with a preposition ; but this is just not true. On the contrary, when the relative pronounis omitted in a prepositional relative clause, the prepositioncome at the end of the clause, even if this is also the end of the sentence. As stated above, omission of the relative pronoun in prepositional relative clauses isin modern English.► Continue to part 2 : Relative pronouns and adjectives

9: for French
speakers; click
here
for information on expressing the French
relative pronoun “dont” in English..

Look at English grammar with Linguapress.  Simple rules, clear
examples.

Look at English grammar with Linguapress. Simple rules, clear examples.


Relative Clauses شرح جمل الوصل


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Relative Clauses شرح جمل الوصل

RELATIVE CLAUSES in 4 Steps


Relative Clauses allow us to express more in a single sentence. Here are 4 steps to merging multiple sentences together.
Find this video’s companion resources at http://www.insightstoEnglish.com, including printouts, presentation materials, and further tips and tricks.
This video only covers NONDEFINING RELATIVE CLAUSES.
How to Teach Relative Clauses:
If we have two related sentences, we can put them together into a single sentence by turning one of them into a relative clause. Here are the steps to do so:
1. find the noun used in both sentences
2. decide which clause is relative; put it after the other clause
3. delete the common noun from the relative clause
4. add a relative pronoun at the front of the relative clause.
Finally, separate the two clauses with commas.
Relative pronouns include ‘who’, ‘which’, ‘where’, ‘when’, and ‘whose’.
We use relative clauses to make our speech/writing sound smoother (and therefore more natural). Relative clauses allow us to give more information about the main clause.

0:00 Intro to Clauses
0:27 What are Relative Clauses?
0:49 Shared Nouns \u0026 Relative Pronouns
2:21 The 4 Steps to Putting Clauses Together
5:18 Misplaced Modifiers
6:01 ‘Whose’
6:17 Not Just for Nouns
7:03 When Do We Use Relative Clauses?

For another stepbystep transformation, check out our video on Passive Voice: https://youtu.be/_PCCZ9Pvk2s
[good for nativespeaking learners as well as ESL or EFL students]
Let us know in the comments how the method in this video has helped you and your students with relative clauses!

INSIGHTS TO ENGLISH creates videos and other resources to share alternate perspectives on various grammar topics. Presenting various approaches ensures that no student is left in the dark.
see more at http://www.insightstoEnglish.com

RELATIVE CLAUSES in 4 Steps

Stop Making Mistakes with Relative Clauses! [Which \u0026 That]


WHICH or THAT… \u0026 Relative Clauses! When should you use ‘which’ and ‘that’? Let’s talk about it!
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Stop Making Mistakes with Relative Clauses! [Which \u0026 That]

Relative Clauses | ENGLISH GRAMMAR VIDEOS


Relative pronouns and relative clauses connect two ideas into one sentence. Defining relative clauses don´t use commas and provide necessary information to understand the sentence. Nondefining relative clauses use commas ,,,, and give extra infomation but not necessary information to understand the sentence. They are easy to learn! Watch the video a couple of times and learn to use correct english grammar when speaking English. This video shows when to use relative clauses and which relative pronouns are the most important!
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Level 2 (B1 B2) English grammar videos
1. Comparatives \u0026 Superlatives
2. Zero, 1st \u0026 2nd conditionals
3. Past continuous
4. Future continuous
5. Relative Clauses
6. Modal verbs
7. Present perfect
8. Past perfect
9. Question construction
10. Adverbs
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Relative Clauses | ENGLISH GRAMMAR VIDEOS

Relative Pronouns \u0026 Clauses – English Grammar Lesson


In this lesson, we’re going to look at the use of words such as ‘who’, ‘whom’, ‘whose’, ‘which’, ‘that’ etc. when they are used as relative pronouns to connect two clauses. We will also look at when you can drop these words in a complex sentence.
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Relative Pronouns \u0026 Clauses - English Grammar Lesson

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