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[NEW] Reporting Verb Exercises | reporting verbs – NATAVIGUIDES

reporting verbs: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

1. What are reporting verbs? Reporting verbs are used in academic writing to describe or report on others’ works.

2. Why are they important?
Fundamentally, you can use them for two purposes:

1) To report what a writer has done or believes

2) To express your own attitude towards something a writer has said or done

Examples of the use of reporting verbs:

Johnson (2007) suggests that people who see themselves as lucky are in fact lucky, because they take advantage of more opportunities

Johnson (2007) discusses whether people who see themselves as lucky are in fact lucky, because they take advantage of more opportunities.

There is a wide variety of reporting verbs in the English Language. Below is a list of reporting verbs for reference.

accept
accuse
acknowledge
add
admit
advise
agree
announce
apologise
argue
assure
beg
blame
claim
comment
complain
concede
confirm
consider
critique
decide
declare
demand
demonstrate
deny
disagree
encourage
estimate
explain
imply
indicate
inform
inquire
insist
mention
observe
persuade
postulate
promise
propose
recognize
recommend
refute
remark
report
retort
reveal
show
speculate
suggest
support
suppose
warn

Reporting Verb
Definition

accept:
to receive with approval or favour

according to:
in a manner conforming to; or as stated by

accuse:
to find fault with; blame

acknowledge:
to show or express recognition or realization of

add:
to say or write further

admit:
to confess to be true or the case

advise:
to offer suggestions about the best course of action to someone

agree:
to have the same opinion about something

announce:
to make known or to proclaim

apologise:
to offer an apology or excuse for some fault

argue:
to present reasons for or against something

assure:
to declare earnestly to; to tell someone something positively to dispel any doubts

beg:
to ask someone earnestly or humbly for something

blame:
to hold responsible; to find fault with

claim:
to state or stress that something is the case, typically without providing evidence

comment:
to make remarks, observations or criticisms

complain:
to express dissatisfaction or annoyance about something

concede:
to acknowledge as true

confirm:
to acknowledge with definite assurance

consider:
to think carefully on a matter

critique:
a detailed analysis and assessment of something

decide:
to come to a resolution in the mind as a result of consideration

declare:
to make known or state clearly

demand:
the act or demanding and asking especially with authority

demonstrate:
to show the truth of something that has been observed or investigated

deny:
to state that something is not true

disagree:
to have or express a different opinion

encourage:
to persuade someone to do or continue to do something by giving support and advice

estimate:
an approximate calculation or judgment of the value or extent of something

explain:
to make an idea or situation clear to someone by describing it in great detail

imply:
to indicate or suggest without being explicitly stated

indicate:
to point out or show something

inform:
to give or convey knowledge

inquire:
to seek information by questioning

insist:
to assert or maintain firmly

mention:
to refer to something briefly without going into detail

observe:
to perceive or notice; to make a remark

persuade:
to induce someone to do something through advising and urging

postulate:
to claim or assume the existence or truth of, especially as a basis forreasoning or arguing.

promise:
to declare that something will or will not be done

propose:
to offer or suggest a matter or idea for consideration

recognise:
to acknowledge or accept the existence or validity of something

recommend:
to mention favourably

refute:
to prove a statement or theory to be wrong; to disprove

remark:
to say something or to mention

report:
to give an account of something that has been observed or investigated

retort:
to answer or reply by a counter argument

reveal:
to make previously unknown information known

show:
demonstrate or prove an idea

speculate:
to engage in thought or reflection

suggest:
to put forward for consideration

support:
to agree with or approve or something or someone

suppose:
to believe that something is true

warn:
to tell someone about possible dangers or trouble

NB: Make sure you know the definition of the reporting verb and also when and how to use it in an academic paper.

Table of Contents

Functions of reporting verbs

When using reporting verbs in writing, it is important to know its functions. Reporting verbs may be used to comment on someone’s works, agree or disagree on someone’s idea, or explain someone’s research. Below is a list of functions and its definitions.

agreement
the state of being with the same opinion

advice
to offer advice, guidance or recommendation

argument
an exchange of opposite views, usually in a heated argument

description
to give an account of a person, object or event

disagreement
to show lack of consensus or approval

discussion
the act of talking about something in order to reach a consensus

emphasis
to give special attention or value to something

evaluation
to make a judgment about something or to make an assessment

explanation
to use a statement or account to make something clear

presentation
to show or present something or an idea

suggestion
to put forward an idea or plan for consideration

In addition to its functions, reporting verbs also differ in terms of their strength; for example, ‘to suggest’ is much weaker, and more tentative, than ‘to argue’. The two verbs convey very different pictures about how the author you are studying sees his or her materials and research.

  1. Some reporting verbs show that an author believes strongly in what they say. These are called strong reporting verbs.
  2. There is a group of verbs that writers use to show that they may believe something, but they still wish to be hesitant. These are called tentative reporting verbs.
  3. A third group of verbs is used to describe or report what a writer says as a statement of fact. These are called neutral reporting verbs

 
Tentative
Neutral
Strong
Addition
 
add
 

Advice
 
advise
 

Agreement
admit, concede
accept, acknowledge, agree, concur, confirm, recognise
applaud, congratulate, extol, praise, support

Argument and Persuasion
apologise
assure, encourage, interpret, justify, reason
alert, argue, boast, contend, convince, emphasize, exhort, forbid, insist, prove, promise, persuade, threaten, warn

Believing
guess, hope, imagine
believe, claim, declare, express, feel, hold, know, maintain, profess, subscribe to, think
assert, guarantee, insist, uphold

Conclusion
 
conclude, discover, find, infer, realize
 

Description
confuse
 
 

Disagreement and Questioning
doubt, question
challenge, debate, disagree, question, request, wonder
accuse, attack, complain, contradict, criticize, deny, discard, disclaim, discount, dismiss, dispute, disregard, negate, object to, oppose, refute, reject

Discussion
comment
discuss, explore
reason

Emphasis
 
 
accentuate, emphasize, highlight, stress, underscore, warn

Evaluation and Examination
 
analyse, appraise, assess, compare, consider, contrast, critique, evaluate, examine, investigate, understand
blame, complain, ignore, scrutinize, warn

Explanation
 
articulate, clarify, explain
 

Presentation
confuse
comment, define, describe, estimate, forget, identify, illustrate, imply, inform, instruct, list, mention, notes, observes, outline, point out, present, remark, remind, report, restate, reveal, show, state, study, tell, use
announce, promise

Suggestion
allege, intimidate, speculate
advise, advocate, hypothesize, posit, postulate, propose, suggest, theorize
assert, recommend, urge

The table is adapted from the following source:
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/writingcentre/learning_guides/learningGuide_verbsForReporting.pdf

The table is adapted from the following source:

NB: It is important to note that reporting verbs fit into different sentence patterns and that some can fit into more than one.

Structure 1: reporting verb + that + main idea

Bran (1999) argues that providing safe drinking water will improve the situation of deaths by cholera in Africa.

Hilton (1999) believes that euthanasia should be legalised as “everyone has an explicit right to die”.

As a long-time supporter of euthanasia, Amis (2010) agrees that ‘booths’ should be set up on every street corner for easy access to those who wish to terminate their life”.

In his research on alcohol and its effect on liver functions, Butler (2012) claims that females are more susceptible to the development of cirrhosis by twenty-five percent.

Striker (2009) maintains that the minimum age to attain a driving licence should be at 18 years old, because international studies show that driver’s younger than this are more likely to be the cause of an accident.

Kim (2009) acknowledges that economic reform is essential in order to revitalise consumer confidence.

Barker (2014) suggests that one reason for the increase in investor visa applications in Australia is due to Xi Jin Ping’s anti-graft campaign.

Structure 2: reporting verb + preposition (as/to/for/with/of)

Marx (2014) defines technology as “the greatest invention of mankind”.

See also  [Update] วิธีการพูดนำเสนอเป็นภาษาอังกฤษ (Presentation) | present ภาษาอังกฤษ - NATAVIGUIDES

In his research, Liu (2013) compares the paparazzi’s intrusion of privacy to sexual assault.

Plush (2013) blames the lack of provincial monetary support for the spread of HIV in Tanzania.

Butters (2011) disagrees with Parkers (2010) that the shift in tectonic plates causes atmospheric instability.

Ruth (1988) warns of possible setbacks in the South Korea’s national stability if the government does not join forces with the American military.

Structure 3: reporting verb + noun (noun phrase)

Miller (2010) supports the legalisation of gay marriages in Hong Kong.

Quill (1988) discusses the positive effects of meditation as a treatment for anxiety sufferers in solitary confinement.

Davidson (1992) identifies the implementation of capital punishment as a necessity for deterring crime.

In his discussion on child brides in Yemen, Telling (2011) highlights the role of government authorities and Islamic Leaders on this growing problem.

Johns (1999) validates the argument that Pilates is more suitable for healing spinal injuries than chiropractic procedures during pregnancy.

Chan (2014) applauds the Hong Kong Students Union for their stance on attaining universal suffrage.

Toms (1982) challenges the common belief that humans have five senses. In his research, he finds that there are in fact nine senses.

[NEW] Reporting Verbs | reporting verbs – NATAVIGUIDES

Existen ciertos puntos gramaticales que todos los estudiantes de inglés resienten cuando se topan con ellos, sea el nivel que sea. Este es el caso de los reporting verbs o verbos de estilo indirecto. Así que presta mucha atención y ponte las pilas, porque este punto gramatical no es fácil y requiere de mucha atención y, sobre todo, mucho trabajo.

Qué son los Reporting Verbs

Los reporting verbs son verbos que utilizamos para comunicar ideas, acciones o intenciones de la gente en un momento dado. Estos verbos, como su propio nombre indica, son verbos de estilo indirecto, exactamente igual que los verbos say, tell o ask, que tanto se utilizan en el estilo indirecto en inglés (reported speech). Sin embargo, la particularidad de la mayoría de los reporting verbs es que no solo comunican un mensaje, sino también una intención, sentimiento, idea, etc.

Los Reporting Verbs no solo comunican un mensaje, sino también una intención, sentimiento, idea, etc.

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Por ejemplo, para ilustrar la afirmación anterior, vamos a ver cómo la siguiente oración en estilo directo puede representarse en estilo indirecto de varias formas, algunas mejor y otras peor:

Jack said to Martha, “You stole my wallet!”

Podemos utilizar un sencillo estilo indirecto diciendo Jack said to Martha that she had stolen his wallet. Sin embargo, esa oración de estilo indirecto simplemente adapta las palabras originales al estilo indirecto, sin comunicar la intención de la oración que realmente es una acusación. Por ello, con un reporting verb podríamos conseguir un resultado mucho mejor:

Jack accused Martha of stealing his wallet.

Esa oración es mucho más fidedigna al contexto original que la que simplemente reproduce las palabras textualmente.

El problema de muchos de los reporting verbs es que adoptan estructuras diferentes, algunos con objeto, otros sin objeto, algunos con preposiciones, otros sin preposiciones, etc. Por ello, es necesario trabajar con una clasificación avanzada de verbos de estilo indirecto.

Cómo usar los Reporting Verbs

La manera más “sencilla” (por decirlo de algún modo) de comprender cómo funcionan los verbos de estilo indirecto (reporting verbs) es clasificándolos en diferentes categorías según la estructura que sigue a dicho verbo.

Por eso, en esta sección vamos a agrupar los reporting verbs atendiendo a la estructura que adoptan, pero antes debes tener en cuenta lo siguiente:

  • Algunos verbos aparecen en más de una categoría, como por ejemplo el verbo advise.
  • La partícula that es siempre opcional en las oraciones de ejemplo.
  • El objeto sb. significa somebody.
  • El objeto sth. significa something.
  • Si el objeto (sb. o sth.) o la preposición viene entre paréntesis, significa que puede o no aparecer. Si aparece sin paréntesis, significa que el verbo necesita el objeto.
  • Es mucho más fácil estudiar los reporting verbs sabiendo qué verbos van seguidos de infinitivo o gerundio.
  • Es imprescindible saber utilizar el estilo indirecto a nivel intermedio antes de comenzar con los reporting verbs avanzados.

Veamos ahora los 5 grandes grupos en los que se clasifican los reporting verbs en inglés.

1. Reporting verbs seguidos de “(s.o.) + (preposition) + verb-ing”

En esta categoría tenemos verbos que van seguidos de un gerundio (verb-ing) y, opcionalmente, de un objeto y/o una preposición.

accuse sb. ofadmit (to)advise sb. againstapologise (to sb.) forconfess toblame sb. forconsidercriticise sb. fordenycongratulate onforbid sb. frominsist onjustifyproposerecommendregretsuggestwarn sb. about/of

Veamos algunos ejemplos de oraciones con estos verbos:

Estilo directo: “You should really avoid driving through the city centre,” he said. 
Estilo indirecto: He advised me against driving through the city centre.

Estilo directo: “Come on, man! We really ought to go the party,” he insisted.
Estilo indirecto: My friend insisted on going to the party.

2. Reporting verbs seguidos de “to + infinitive”

En esta categoría se encuentran los reporting verbs que van seguidos de un infinitivo simplemente.

agreedemandpromiseaskforgetrefusedecideofferthreaten

Algunos ejemplos de oraciones con estos verbos de estilo indirecto son:

Estilo directo: “Let me give you a hand with those bags,” he said. 
Estilo indirecto: He offered to give me a hand with the bags.

Estilo directo: “We will not be cutting back on education or healthcare,” the president said. 
Estilo indirecto: The president promised not to cut back on education or healthcare. 

3. Reporting verbs seguidos de “sb. + to + infinitive”

En este caso, tenemos verbos seguidos de un infinitivo pero también con un objeto obligatoriamente:

advise sb.ask sb.encourage sb. forbid sb.instruct sb.invite sb.order sb.persuade sb.prefer sb.remind sb.request sb.tell sb.urge sb.warn sb.

A continuación tienes un par de ejemplos en los que se utilizan estos reporting verbs:

Estilo directo: “Please, put us up for the weekend, will you?” they asked. 
Estilo indirecto: They persuaded me to put them up for the weekend.

Estilo directo: “You will do as I say, or else!” he said. 
Estilo indirecto: He warned me to do as he said.

4. Reporting verbs seguidos de “(sb.) (that) + clause”

En este caso, tenemos una larga lista de verbos que siguen esta estructura. Sin embargo, es la más fácil, pues estos verbos siguen las normas regulares del estilo indirecto de nivel intermedio. Es decir, funcionan igual el verbo say.

addadmitagreeannouncearguebelieveclaimcomplainconsiderconfessconfirmdecidedenydoubt (that/wether)estimateexpect sb.explainfeelhopeimplyinsistmeanmentionobjectpersuadepredictpromise (sb.)reassurereckonremarkrepeatreplyreportregretsaystatesupposetell sb.thinkthreatenwarn sb.

A continuación tienes algunos ejemplos de oraciones con verbos pertenecientes a esta categoría:

Estilo directo: “Oh hell! I’ll have to put up with his nonsense all weekend!” she said. 
Estilo indirecto: She complained that she would have to put up with his nonsense all weekend.

Estilo directo: “Don´t worry. I will have a word with him, I promise,” my boss said. 
Estilo indirecto: My boss promised (me) that he would have a word with him. 

5. Reporting verbs seguidos de “(that) + (past) subjunctive” or “(that) + should”

Esta última categoría es la más rara de todas, ya que engloba una serie de verbos que van seguidos de una clause con el verbo en modo subjuntivo o con should. Lo problemático es que, como ya sabrás, en inglés no existe una forma verbal específica para el modo subjuntivo, por lo que normalmente utilizamos el infinitivo o el pasado simple, como veremos en algunos ejemplos más adelante.

adviseagreedemandinsistpreferpropose

recommend

request

suggest

urge

Los verbos recommend y suggest aparecen subrayados porque son especialmente comunes en esta forma. Veamos un par de ejemplos precisamente con estos dos verbos:

Estilo directo: “We believe it’s a good idea for you to apply for the job again.” my parents told me. 
Estilo indirecto: My parents suggested that I should apply for the job again. 

La traducción de esta oración sería algo así como “Mis padres me sugirieron que solicitara el trabajo de nuevo.”

Estilo directo: “That restaurant is awesome. You should give it a try,” he said.
Estilo indirecto: He recommended that I give/gave that restaurant a try.

La traducción de esta última oración sería algo como “Me recomendó que probara ese restaurante.”


Reporting Verbs- English Grammar Lesson


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Reporting Verbs- English Grammar Lesson

Live English Class – Reporting Verbs


📣Hi friends! Missed Tom’s live English lesson on how to use reporting verbs? 🤔 No problem! 🤩 You can watch it now and you can practise what you’ve learned by downloading a free English grammar worksheet here. 👉 https://bbc.in/3sZvWpQ
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More live classes to catch up on:
How to use the past to talk about the present with Charlotte
https://youtu.be/HvoTU6xMFg
How to use linking words to show contrast with James
https://youtu.be/isDT2kxBN6M
Mixed conditionals with Charlotte
https://youtu.be/DgFZ7qqcJck
Linking words for conversation with Sian
https://youtu.be/zaOVrykwtFc
The difference between ‘enough’ and ‘too’ with Charlotte
https://youtu.be/jF9ixidDj5k
LearningEnglish LiveEnglishClass Reportingverbs

Live English Class - Reporting Verbs

Reporting verbs


Reporting verbs

Grammar Lesson: Reporting Verbs


Susan explains Reporting Verbs to her Upper Intermediate and Advanced English class.

Grammar Lesson: Reporting Verbs

Reported verbs


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Reported verbs

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