Home » [NEW] Present Perfect Progressive Examples | present perfect progressive – NATAVIGUIDES

[NEW] Present Perfect Progressive Examples | present perfect progressive – NATAVIGUIDES

present perfect progressive: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

Present Perfect Progressive

The Present Perfect Progressive Tense Explained with Examples

The Present perfect progressive tense (or Present perfect continuous tense, as it’s also known) shows action that has been continuously happening up to the present moment.

We use this verb tense to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now; or that an action has been happening over time until now. Simply put, the present perfect progressive has the meaning of lately or recently.

The present perfect progressive tense is usually combined with a length of time phraseOpens in new window (such as, and etc.) to indicate action that started in the past and continues to the present.

See Practical Examples

  • I’ve been

    cleaning

    my house .

  • Gretchen has been

    reading

    noon.

  • We’ve been

    waiting

    for Andy over an hour.

Perhaps you have studied and understood the meaning of present perfect tenseOpens in new window, you might be wondering, “How come! present perfect progressive seems to have the same meaning as .”

You’re right, present perfect with a length of time almost always means the same as present perfect progressive. That raises some questions: “Are present perfect and present perfect progressive always the same? And if they’re not, You’ll find the answers to these questions down below.

How to Use the Present Perfect Continuous Tense

1.  Expression of Affirmative Statements with Present Perfect Continuous — To make affirmative statement with present perfect continuous tense, the Structure: Subject + has/have + been + verb–ing (form) is used.

See Practical Examples

  • Andy has been

    thinking

    about getting a new car.

  • Laurel and Benson have been

    remodeling

    their garage.

  • We’ve been

    studying

    verb tenses for so long that now we’re beginning to have gray hair.

2.  Expression of Negative Statements with Present Perfect Continuous Tense — To make negative statement with present perfect continuous tense, the Structure: Subject + has/have + not been + verb–ing (form) is used. The Contraction form: Subject + hasn’t/haven’t + not been + verb–ing(form) is also used.

See Practical Examples

  • Andy has not been

    spending

    time with his family since he started a part time course.

  • Lola hasn’t been

    using

    her favorite car recently.

  • Mum and Dad have not been

    going

    to church together.

3.  Expression of Interrogative Statements with Present Perfect Continuous Tense — To make interrogative statement using present perfect continuous tense, the Structure: (interrogative word) + have/has + subject + been + verb–ing (form) is used.

See Practical Examples

  • Has Andy been attending English classes?
  • has Lola been taking dancing practices?
  • have they been avoiding one another?

4.  Expression of Negative Interrogative statements with Present Perfect Continuous Tense. — To make negative interrogative statement using present perfect continuous tense, the Structure: (interrogative word) + have/has not + subject + been + verb–ing (form) is used. However, the Contracted Form: () + haven’t/hasn’t + subject + been + verb–ing (form) is sometimes preferred.

See Practical Examples

  • Has Andy been attending English classes?
  • Have they been avoiding one another?
  • Has Lola been taking dancing practices?

Note that the Interrogatives are rarely used in formal contexts. Chances are you will seldom have needs to use them.

What’s this?

Difference between Present Perfect Progressive Tense and Present Perfect Tense

The biggest difference between these two tenses lies in the fact that present perfect is a bit of a headache because it has more than three different meanings depending on the time phrase it is used with, but present perfect progressive, on the other hand, has only one meaning.

Present Perfect Tense: Variation of Meanings

Now we can observe the meanings of present perfect tense:

Meaning #1

  • Ms. Allyson has taught BUS 211
  • (When we use

    present perfect + a length of time

    , it means the action started in the past and has continued until now.)

Meaning #2

  • Ms. Allyson has taught BUS 211.
  • (This sentence has a different meaning. When we use

    present perfect without a time phrase

    , it means the action ended in the past, but the time is not clear.)

Meaning #3

  • Ms. Allyson has taught BUS 211 today.
  • (This sentence also has a different meaning. When we use

    present perfect with a time phrase

    that includes the present, it means about the same as the simple past.)

Present perfect progressive on the other hand, is straightforward and simple. It only has one meaning; it always means this action has been happening over time until now (or almost until now).

With present perfect, we always need to use a length of time to show it is present perfect. But with present perfect progressive, it doesn’t matter if we use a time phrase or not; it always means the same thing.

Examples of Present perfect progressive tense

  • I have been working on the plant since last month.
  • (This action has been happening over time until now.)

  • I have been working on the plant.
  • (This action has been happening over time until now.)

  • I have been working on the plant today.
  • (This action has been happening over time until now.)

When it’s ideal to use present perfect progressive tense

As we learned earlier, present perfect progressive has the same meaning as present perfect, so we can often use either one and still have the same meaning.

Comparative Examples:

Present Perfect

  • I have taught at St. Mary’s Anglican School for eight years.

Present Perfect Progressive

  • I have been teaching at St. Mary’s Anglican School for eight years.

These two sentences mean the same thing: The described action has been happening over time until now.

Present Perfect

  • Andy has worked in the same store for several innumerable years.

Present Perfect Progressive

  • Andy has been working in the same store for several innumerable years.

These two sentences mean the same thing: The described action has been happening over time until now.

simple-rule

Simple Rule for Using Present Perfect Progressive.

When an action started in the past and has continued until now:

  • use present perfect progressive for most verbs
  • use

    present perfect + a length of time

    for stative verbs.

See Practical Examples:

  • Ms. Allyson has been teaching BUS 211 since she was 22.
  • ()

  • Ever since he was a child, Effiong has believed in treating others kindly.
  • ()

  • George has been trying to fix that toaster for hours.
  • ()

  • Afam has known Effiong since they were both twelve.
  • ()

It would be great if we could always use either tense, but unfortunately, sometimes only one sounds correct to native speakers (for example, the sentence, “Cassius has eaten dinner for an hour” sounds wrong.)

When should we use present perfect progressive and when should we use present perfect meaning #2?

The actual rule for this is complicated, but if you follow this simpler rule, you’ll always be okay. (If you really want to follow the whole episode of this study, click on this link for “MORE THAN THE SIMPLE RULE.” Opens in new window

[NEW] Present Perfect Continuous Tense | present perfect progressive – NATAVIGUIDES

Present Perfect Continuous

The present perfect continuous (also called present perfect progressive) is a verb tense which is used to show that an action started in the past and has continued up to the present moment. The present perfect continuous usually emphasizes duration, or the amount of time that an action has been taking place. Read on for detailed descriptions, examples, and present perfect continuous exercises.

Present Perfect Continuous Forms

The present perfect continuous is formed using has/have + been + present participle. Questions are indicated by inverting the subject and has/have. Negatives are made with not.

  • Statement:

    You have been waiting here for two hours.

  • Question:

    Have you been waiting here for two hours?

  • Negative:

    You have not been waiting here for two hours.

Complete List of Present Perfect Continuous Forms

Present Perfect Continuous Uses

USE 1 Duration from the Past Until Now

We use the present perfect continuous to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now. “For five minutes,” “for two weeks,” and “since Tuesday” are all durations which can be used with the present perfect continuous.

Examples:

  • They have been talking for the last hour.
  • She has been working at that company for three years.
  • What have you been doing for the last 30 minutes?
  • James has been teaching at the university since June.
  • We have been waiting here for over two hours!
  • Why has Nancy not been taking her medicine for the last three days?

USE 2 Recently, Lately

You can also use the present perfect continuous WITHOUT a duration such as “for two weeks.” Without the duration, the tense has a more general meaning of “lately.” We often use the words “lately” or “recently” to emphasize this meaning.

Examples:

  • Recently, I have been feeling really tired.
  • She has been watching too much television lately.
  • Have you been exercising lately?
  • Mary has been feeling a little depressed.
  • Lisa has not been practicing her English.
  • What have you been doing?

IMPORTANT

Remember that the present perfect continuous has the meaning of “lately” or “recently.” If you use the present perfect continuous in a question such as “Have you been feeling alright?”, it can suggest that the person looks sick or unhealthy. A question such as “Have you been smoking?” can suggest that you smell the smoke on the person. Using this tense in a question suggests you can see, smell, hear or feel the results of the action. It is possible to insult someone by using this tense incorrectly.

REMEMBER Non-Continuous Verbs/ Mixed Verbs

It is important to remember that non-continuous verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Also, certain non-continuous meanings for mixed verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Instead of using present perfect continuous with these verbs, you must use present perfect.

Examples:

  • Sam has been having his car for two years. Not Correct
  • Sam has had his car for two years. Correct

ADVERB PLACEMENT

The examples below show the placement for grammar adverbs such as: always, only, never, ever, still, just, etc.

Examples:

  • You have only been waiting here for one hour.
  • Have you only been waiting here for one hour?

ACTIVE / PASSIVE

Examples:

  • Recently, John has been doing the work. Active
  • Recently, the work has been being done by John. Passive

NOTE: Present perfect continuous is less commonly used in its passive form.

More About Active / Passive Forms

Present Perfect Continuous Exercises


Unit 3 | The Present perfect | مستر محمد الديب


للمزيد تابعنا على موقع بسطتهالك https://www.bassthalk.com/
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Unit 3 | The Present perfect  | مستر محمد الديب

Present Perfect Tense | Simple or Continuous? | FOR \u0026 SINCE 🤔


In this lesson, we’ll fix some common grammar mistakes made by English students when using the present perfect tense!
1. When should I use the present perfect simple and when should I use the present perfect continuous? [01:28]
2. When do I use ‘since’ and ‘for’? [07:37]
These are both really important questions when you are using the perfect tenses in English! And this video lesson will answer BOTH of them!
Later in the lesson, I’ll also show you how to use ‘for’ and ‘since’ with the present perfect tenses. Both of these words explain how long something has been happening. So, when you want to give more information about the amount of time that an action has been happening for the duration of the action you can use FOR or SINCE.
Use FOR with a period of time.
Use SINCE with a specific point in time.
Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/09/26/presentperfecttensesimpleorcontinuous/

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Present Perfect Tense | Simple or Continuous? | FOR \u0026 SINCE 🤔

Present perfect progressive – einfach erklärt | Einfach Englisch


Herzlich Willkommen bei Einfach Englisch!
In diesem Video schauen wir uns die Zeitform present perfect progressive an.
Wie wird es gebildet? Und wann benutzt man es überhaupt? Diese Fragen werden beantwortet.
Kapitel:
0:00 Intro
0:20 Bildung allgemein
0:55 Bildung Aussagesätze
1:16 Bildung Verneinungen
1:38 Bildung Fragen
2:15 Benutzung
3:10 Unterschied zum present perfect
Wenn Dir das Video gefallen hat, würde ich mich sehr über einen Daumen nach oben freuen!

Present perfect progressive - einfach erklärt | Einfach Englisch

Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge!


Will you be able to pass my Present Perfect Progressive Challenge?! In this lesson, you will review the grammatical structure of the present perfect progressive tense and learn how to use it in conversation. You’ll hear many examples taken from real English conversations and I’ll explain how and when you should use this tense. Here is the challenge: First, watch this video. Second, take the quiz to make sure you’re using the tense correctly. Third, use the present perfect progressive tense in conversation or in our comments section. Complete this challenge and you’ll become more comfortable USING the grammar you learn. Good luck! Practice makes perfect!
TAKE THE QUIZ ON MY WEBSITE: https://www.engvid.com/presentperfectprogressivechallenge/
TRANSCRIPT
Hello. My name is Emma and in today’s video we are going to talk about grammar, and specifically we are going to talk about the present perfect progressive, and this video is a bit special because in this video I am going to challenge you to use the present perfect progressive in a sentence or in a conversation this week. Okay? So, maybe you’ve heard of the Ice Bucket Challenge, well, this isn’t that. This is the: \”Present Perfect Progressive Challenge\”. Okay? And I hope you do this. So, here’s the challenge: Use present perfect progressive tense in one conversation this week. So, in order to do this, first I’m going to teach you: What is the present perfect progressive? We can also call it the present perfect continuous, you might know it by that name. So I’m going to talk about what it is, why we use it. I’m going to teach you about the form of it, so: How does it look? And then we’re going to practice it and we’re going to talk about how we can actually use this in a conversation. Because I know what happens with many students, they go to class or, you know, they’re studying online and they find these great grammar worksheets or resources, and they do them at home and it’s great on paper, but then when they’re actually in a conversation they get scared about making a mistake or they can’t remember the grammar, and so they don’t use it. So this video is more practical because I want you to use this grammar.
Okay, so let’s look at some examples of the present perfect continuous or present perfect progressive. That’s going to get tiring to say. It’s such a long grammatical term, so if I make a mistake, you know, when I’m saying the word, don’t mind that. Okay, so I have some examples here. My first one: \”I have\”so this is part of the form\”been working at my company for 5 years\”. So, just take a moment to think about that. \”I have been working at my company for 5 years.\” Now, let’s look at another example. We’re going to compare some examples, and then think about what they all mean. \”He has been dating my friend for 2 months. He has been dating my friend for 2 months.\” Let’s look at a third example: \”We have been studying English forever.\” [Laughs] Sometimes it might feel that way, but you know, bear with me. \”We have been studying English forever.\”
Okay, so what do these sentences have in common? Well, first of all you probably realize these are all present perfect progressive sentences, and they have a lot of things in common. The main thing that we’re using the present perfect progressive for is we’re talking about how long, so how long something is happening. Okay? So we’re talking about the duration of time, how long something happens for. So you’ll notice: \”I have been working at my company for 5 years.\” Five years is an amount of time. Okay? \”He has been dating my friend for 2 months.\” Two months is a period of time. \”We have been studying English forever.\” Forever is a very long period of time. Okay? So we’re talking about periods of time when we’re talking about the present perfect progressive, and we’re really answering the question: \”How long?\” or \”How much time?\” Okay? So now let’s talk a little bit more about the meaning and the form.
Okay, so we’ve looked at some examples of the present perfect progressive, and let’s think a little bit more about the meaning. I’ve drawn here a timeline. Okay? So this is now, today, right now; this is the future; and this is the past. Okay? So when we’re talking about the… Well, actually any grammar, what can be really helpful is looking at timelines, they can really help you understand, you know, what these different tenses mean. So let’s look at our timeline and what the present perfect progressive tense would look like on the timeline. So, I have here my first example: \”I have been working at my company for 5 years.\” This means that five years ago, so let’s go to the pastone, two, three, four, fiveI started working, so this is the beginning, and this action continued and continued and continued to right now, so I’m still doing it.

Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge!

How to Use the Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous


In this lesson, you can learn about the present perfect simple and present perfect continuous verb forms.\r\rWhat’s the difference between ‘I have done’ and ‘I have been doing?’ When should you use the present perfect continuous? You’ll see the answers to these questions in this lesson.\r Do you want more grammar practice? The OOE teachers are here to help you! Learn more: http://bit.ly/ooeteachers.
See the full lesson with script on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/presentperfectpresentperfectcontinuous.
Contents:
Intro 00:00 00:55
How to Form the Present Perfect Continuous 00:55 04:04
Using the Present Perfect Continuous: Linking Past and Present 04:04 07:20
Using the Present Perfect Continuous: Explaining Present Results 07:20 08:59
Present Perfect Simple vs. Continuous 08:59 12:06
Focus on Results vs. Focus on Process 12:06
This lesson will help you:
Understand how to correctly form the present perfect continuous verb tense in English.
See example dialogues of how to use the present perfect continuous.
Learn how to use the present perfect continuous in English to connect the past to the present.
Use the present perfect continuous tense to explain results that are in the present.
See the main differences between the present perfect simple and present perfect continuous tenses.
Learn about state verbs like ‘be’ and why you can’t use them in the present perfect continuous, along with an exception.
Know the difference between describing results and describing processes when using the present perfect and present perfect continuous.
Become more comfortable choosing between present perfect simple or present perfect continuous when speaking and writing in English.
SUBSCRIBE to continue improving your English! https://goo.gl/UUQW8j
See more free English lessons like this one on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.

How to Use the Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous

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ขอบคุณที่รับชมกระทู้ครับ present perfect progressive

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